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mcnarym1

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mcnarym1 last won the day on August 30 2016

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About mcnarym1

  • Rank
    Regular Contributor
  • Birthday 11/24/1992

Profile Info

  • Search Profile
    User of a hearing implant
  • Implant Type
    Cochlear Implant
  • Country
    United States

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  1. Hi there! I was just wanting to ask, has anyone ended up having to do vestibular rehabilitation due to getting the CI? My balance has always been off as I was sick as a kid. I've always relied on my left side to balance me, I lean to the left because I think it's center/etc. I got my CI in the left ear though and it hasn't been too bad, but I do feel nauseous a lot when I lay back or it just comes on suddenly. I'm a little nervous to start rehab but I'm definitely ready for it! I haven't ridden a bike in about 10 years so I'm looking forward to working to be able to do that again. Just c
  2. I wouldn't be too worried honestly. It just takes time, even after awhile. At least the MedEl person I was talking to before my CI surgery told me that. I got activated in July and can already understand about 80% of things but it's those specific pitches that are so hard. I went to go see Wicked the musical last weekend and I could understand everything except when Glinda was singing popular, way too high pitched. That could be why your friend had issues, because it wasn't just a voice but the voice had to travel through the intercom and you have all those people in the airport making noises
  3. My doctors gave me many things to help clan the area. I was given hydrogen peroxide to mix with saline solution (you don't need much at all but make it a 50/50 mix) then dip a q-tip in it and clean the area of the scar. Then after you do that I was also given essentially a neosporin or bacteria cream to prevent it from any germs/etc. You can pick all of this stuff up at any drug store if you weren't given anything.
  4. My audi never said anything about focusing on JUST the sounds and getting familiar with them? That's a little odd. I mean maybe like wait one more day to get used to some sounds but if you go to that link for MedEL, some of the games I think are just sound practice but it's more sentence practicing. I would practice that as well because it's the only way you may adapt to normal sounds faster. Some people do the hair shaving thing some don't. It's really your choice. I didn't shave the entire part and have a bald spot there, what I did was instead what you said. Shave under the normal len
  5. Great news! Everything you're going through is exactly what I did. I had 2 back to back appointments at Johns Hopkins, they said they do this because the first day is really just getting used to the CI and not too much mapping goes into it. Obviously they adjust volume on the first day but don't do much fine tuning. The volume of your CI changes like you said and it's the same for me. When I get mapping done everything seems loud for like an hour and then my brain accepts it at the correct volume. I finally just finished my mapping appointments that were like once a month but I remember thinki
  6. Yes! So my story is a bit unique, everyone's is. I had cancer as a child and therefore have always had issues with hearing due to the amount of radiation I had to have. Hearing in my right ear has always been very low since the tumor was wrapped around my brainstem and affected mostly my right side. I have struggled very little on the left ear. I have had an auto immune inner ear disease before where I just wake up one day and can barely hear anything. It was able to be treated with meds for a week. In February of this year, I woke up one day and my hearing was gone in my left ear. I hated it
  7. OMG! I had an autoimmune inner ear disease too! My meds only worked for a week and it went bad from there. I was told a CI was the only option as well. I had the worst sounds/tinnitus in my head before I got activated too. I'm happy to answer whatever questions you might have! I have been activated now for about a month and a half.
  8. Like Kara said, there's really no way of knowing if it will develop. For me, I had it very bad before I had the surgery, due to sensorineural hearing loss. Once I got the surgery it got a little bit better but at that point I was so used to it. It may develop after surgery because you're messing with those nerves and if you make them "mad" then tinnitus can result. After my activation though, my tinnitus got SO much better. Today was the first day I was able to put my hearing aid back in my other ear and combined with the CI, I barely notice tinnitus. I hope you don't develop it if you don't h
  9. Hi Tony! Sounds like you're off to a great start with the CI. Group settings are still hard for me and I'm a month into having the CI, that just takes time because your brain is trying to get used to voices at different pitches so when you're in a group setting, it's almost like speeding the process up and your brain isn't ready for that. I have a rondo as well but don't use it yet since it doesn't stay on well. It's like Ivana said, it's just because of the swelling. My doctors told me it can take awhile for the swelling to go fully away but as it goes down, the magnet will work better. I rea
  10. Just curious, it's probably a dumb question but how do you all listen to music? With headphones? I ask because I was implanted in my left ear so that made my left ear completely deaf, if I were to put headphones in that ear, I wouldn't hear a thing. Is there something that you can essentially hook to your processor to hear? Same thing goes for the phone. I can sort of make it out when talking to someone on speaker. My right ear is also been weak at hearing since I was younger so I can never understand anything clearly in that ear therefore my left one was the dominant ear for phone calls
  11. Just curious, it's probably a dumb question but how do you all listen to music? With headphones? I ask because I was implanted in my left ear so that made my left ear completely deaf, if I were to put headphones in that ear, I wouldn't hear a thing. Is there something that you can essentially hook to your processor to hear? Same thing goes for the phone. I can sort of make it out when talking to someone on speaker. My right ear is also been weak at hearing since I was younger so I can never understand anything clearly in that ear therefore my left one was the dominant ear for phone calls
  12. Your appointment on the 30th is most likely another mapping appointment for your CI. When I got my surgery I waited 3 weeks and then got activated and that day they did some mapping obviously. You'll have two more mapping appointments shortly after that, each one being about 1.5-2 hours long. These are just adjustments to your CI like volume and stuff. Yes you get a kit when you get activated, it's literally like Christmas. I got both a sonnet and a Rondo as well and in my kit there's soooo much stuff, there's batteries beyond batteries, a dome for cleaning your ear piece at night, replacement
  13. No problem! Since I'm newer with the CI implant I figured I can help you through it. I had all those nervous feelings and so many wuestions before I got the implant. When I was 5 I had a brain tumor wrapped around my cranial nerve. So that's where the hearing loss in my right ear came from, due to having to get so much radiation, it affected my right side the most.
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