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Mary Featherston

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  1. Like
    Mary Featherston reacted to Rick H in New to hear peers & Choosing brands   
    Hi everyone 
    i just wanted to thank everyone for sharing your experiences & advice! It really helped me to make an informed decision! I had my pre-op appointment with my surgeon & audiologists yesterday.  In 2 weeks from today I’ll start my new journey & be implanted with a Med-el Synchrony with Sonnet2/Rondo2 processors! Yeah!!😀
    getting nervous but I’m sure it is going to be great!
    thanks again
    Rick H
  2. Like
    Mary Featherston got a reaction from Mary Beth in Finding the HearPeers Forum   
    I think I just stumbled on it while I was researching the three brands.
     
  3. Like
    Mary Featherston reacted to Mary Beth in The importance of the internal components when choosing a CI brand   
    This is a great article that explains and shows various electrode array designs by different CI brands and the result on insertion trauma to the cochlea as well as hearing ability with the CI.
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378595517302940
  4. Like
    Mary Featherston reacted to VeroNika in First sound you heard today...a little fun   
    Birds outside my window - a really nice sound! :)
  5. Like
    Mary Featherston reacted to Jdashiell in First sound you heard today...a little fun   
    Well we managed to escape the monster Dorian that wreaked havoc of the Bahamas and the North florida coast as is continues to move northward.
    There was a lot to prepare for and later restore to normalcy.
    I pray for the people in the current path and and beyond.
  6. Like
    Mary Featherston got a reaction from Mary Beth in New Implant   
    @Don Doherty hello and welcome!  It's a small world, I have a friend who lives in Virginia Beach and teaches nursing at Sentara's  program.
    When is your activation?  That's when the fun really begins.
  7. Like
    Mary Featherston got a reaction from Mary Beth in Rondo 2 purchase   
    @Sandy123 oh, that's a nice offer.  I love Rondo2, it sounds great and is comfortable.  I use my Sonnets at work because I'm often back in production where it's noisy and I like going to Adaptive then, but I'd use the Rondo2 otherwise.
  8. Like
    Mary Featherston got a reaction from Mary Beth in My opinion - Hold off on CI until the users get better control of adjustments   
    @Sandy123 that's great!  I'm so glad for you.
  9. Like
    Mary Featherston reacted to Sandy123 in My opinion - Hold off on CI until the users get better control of adjustments   
    Thank you the two Mary's lol  Yes I am delighted with my progress so far.   It's been an exciting time....
  10. Like
    Mary Featherston reacted to Don Doherty in New Implant   
    Hello Everyone,
    I am new to the group and would like to introduce myself. My name is Don Doherty and I am 73 years young. I lost some of my hearing while serving as an automatic rifleman in the Marine Corps during my tour in Vietnam (66-67). It got bad enough that I was medically evacuated from Puerto Rico in 1970 where I was then stationed, to Philadelphia Naval Hospital which was the Hearing Center at the time. I was tested and diagnosed with bilateral neurosensory high frequency hearing loss and had a hearing aid ordered. While waiting for the aid to come in I was fortunate to undergo an aural rehabilitation program which the military had in those days. When my in-the-ear aid came in (June 1970) I learned I was being recommended for discharge. I appealed this Physical Evaluation Board (PEB) finding and was allowed to finish my Marine Corps career provided I change my military occupational speciality and limit my exposure to loud noise. I had many challenges being a Marine with a hearing aid but finally retired in 1987. When I was released from the Marine Corps I went to the Veterans Administration where I was issued a much needed second hearing aid. I then worked for the Veterans Administration for the next 25 years. All totaled I had worn hearing aids for about 45 years. As my hearing grew progressively worse, my audiologist told me my hearing aids were no longer helping me. I then began to consider getting a Cochlear Implant. It took me doing some study and research before I finally made the commitment to proceed. The approval process came from the Veterans Administration as my hearing loss was considered service connected and they were going to pay for it. I chose Med-El because I wanted the latest technology, the ability to have an MRI, and an implant that could get as close to the hearing nerve as possible. I also attended two Med-El Mingles where I liked the staff especially Taylor Sands who was very helpful and answered many of my questions. My decision to get a cochlear implant was reinforced by these Med-El activities and contacts.
    On September 5th I received a Synchrony 2 Cochlear Implant from the esteemed Dr Stephanie Antonio-Moody at Norfolk-Sentara General Hospital in Norfolk, VA. I can’t believe it’s been only six days ago. I have met my Cochlear Implant audiologist, Dr Anna Louthan, and will be getting the Sonnet 2 and Rondo 2 audio processors. My activation date is September 24th, just 13 days away, and I am anxious to begin my new life’s journey.
    I thank everyone in advance for your support.
    Semper Fi,
    Don
     
     
  11. Like
    Mary Featherston reacted to Sandy123 in My opinion - Hold off on CI until the users get better control of adjustments   
    Sorry Neil you are not happy with your implant. I am the opposite just amazed with what I can hear 3 months post. I rarely change the settings. I hear so well in restaurants now it's odd to see my husband struggle in a noisy room lol.  I too do not wear my right hearing aid now as I find it useless compare to my implanted left ear....
  12. Like
    Mary Featherston got a reaction from Daniel the Stranger in My opinion - Hold off on CI until the users get better control of adjustments   
    Hey @Daniel the Stranger nice to see you.  Or your cat, anyway.  🙂  I stopped using my hearing aid within a month of my first activation too.  It was amazing, really, what used to be my primary way to hear was suddenly just a minor nuisance.
  13. Like
    Mary Featherston got a reaction from Mary Beth in My opinion - Hold off on CI until the users get better control of adjustments   
    Hey @Daniel the Stranger nice to see you.  Or your cat, anyway.  🙂  I stopped using my hearing aid within a month of my first activation too.  It was amazing, really, what used to be my primary way to hear was suddenly just a minor nuisance.
  14. Like
    Mary Featherston got a reaction from Mary Beth in My opinion - Hold off on CI until the users get better control of adjustments   
    This, exactly.  The software that's used to map a CI is complex.  There's a reason why CI audiologists are PhDs.
  15. Like
    Mary Featherston reacted to pdk in My opinion - Hold off on CI until the users get better control of adjustments   
    I never use my treble and base settings I sometimes reduce the volume. . 
    I also think that even if one could afford the equipment to do mapping the average person would do more harm than good. There are just too many variables to cope with unless you have extensive training. A CI is not a hearing aid.. There's only one way to go, practice, practice  and more practice your brain will eventually figure it out. 
    Keep on trying, it may take a year but it will work in the end. 
    Peter 
  16. Like
    Mary Featherston got a reaction from Kylie in SSD - possible CI   
    @MaryGP  usually, the more rehab you do, the better you'll hear.  As Kylie mentioned, some people do loads of structured rehab - like Mary Beth.  But keep in mind that every conversation you have, every meeting you go to, every commute spent listening to music - those are all helpful too.  Just not structured and without a specific goal.
     
  17. Like
    Mary Featherston reacted to Mary Beth in SSD - possible CI   
    @MaryGP
    @Kylie and @Mary Featherston have great points.  Everyone approaches training our brains differently.  You will figure out what works best for you and fits best in your schedule.  Aural rehab helps our brains learn how to use the new auditory input.  As we improve in listening with our CIs, we spend much less effort throughout the day trying to hear. 
    I’m sorry if my fondness for aural rehab made you anxious.
    CIs have changed my life and I am thankful every single day when I put on my processors.
    Wishing you the best.
  18. Like
    Mary Featherston reacted to pdk in A WOW moment   
    Yes it is. It's so much better than a hearing aid. Have to continue listening to music. Played an old Harry belafonte CD yesterday and it was sounding pretty good. Although it's not the same most music is enjoyable. I compare it to the early sound of speech with the budgie sounds on top. I used to listen under that higher sound. I try the same method with music and it's beginning to pay off. 
    https://roadtoindependence.co.za/fanie-du-toit/  
    If you haven't found this man, do it now. 
    He's a double implant, has a daily following of 5000 in south Africa. 
    Peter 
  19. Like
    Mary Featherston reacted to Kylie in SSD - possible CI   
    I have a recent CI (4 months since activation) after suffering sudden hearing loss last year, with an inner ear infection. I'm 39 years old. I went straight to CI and didn't do the other surgical options because they seemed inferior for the overall hearing experience. So while I can't compare them I do think I'm getting a realistic type of sound (the quality of which is improving daily). My brain is learning to filter environmental sound, music is getting better, multiple conversations are possible etc. 
    I choose to do my rehab after dinner when the kids are in bed, or occasionally while they are at school if I have some free time on a non-work day.  I am not as committed as @Mary Beth to do multiple sessions per day! But I'm getting fantastic results with 20mins per day. I predominantly use the angel sounds software on my Surface, which works great. Also I've started listening to documentaries and TED talks with and without captions. I don't have an iPad either but there's bunches of good stuff available still. If you go down this path there are great recommendations on this forum on the rehab pages. Whatever devices you have, there will be programs you can use.
  20. Like
    Mary Featherston got a reaction from Kylie in My opinion - Hold off on CI until the users get better control of adjustments   
    @Kylie I agree with your audiologist - I rarely use my remote, I try to adjust to the situation.  Noisy restaurants are my primary reason for using the remote.
  21. Like
    Mary Featherston reacted to pdk in A WOW moment   
    Just had my 6 month mapping session and a program upgrade. Another leap in hearing. I never though it could possibly improve so much  
    Wishing all those starting out as much enjoyment as I am having. 
    Peter 
  22. Thanks
    Mary Featherston got a reaction from Jdashiell in First sound you heard today...a little fun   
    @Jdashiell - oh, sorry, I thought that was more commonly known.  He has sleep apnea.  His sleep study showed that his sleep was interrupted by breathing cessations about once a minute, which clearly means he wasn't getting sufficient sleep and certainly no REM sleep.  And I can tell you, he was one grumpy pain in the butt for a about a year.  The CPAP (actually he just got a new machine, and they're called APAP now, but no one's heard that so I used the old terminology) is a device that helps apnea sufferers breathe at night.  APAP stands for Automatic Positive Airway Pressure.  Ron wears a mask over his nose that looks a bit like an anesthesia mask, and it connects to the machine with a tube, and the machine basically blows air into his nose so he doesn't stop breathing.  The new machine is pretty cool, it can actually tell him how many sleep incidents (non-breathing incidents) he was, and it's gone from once a minute to one or two a night.  It can also detect when his mask isn't sealed correctly, and once he got that fixed, his sleep incidents basically went away.  It's nearly as cool as CIs, for a different health problem!  He even brings it on vacation, his old CPAP has been to England and France.  🙂
  23. Like
    Mary Featherston got a reaction from Mary Beth in Used my waterwear today   
    The scarf is to secure the Sonnets - worked great, I hit about 35 mph and was jumping waves and bouncing all over.
     

  24. Like
    Mary Featherston got a reaction from Mary Beth in First sound you heard today...a little fun   
    @Jdashiell - oh, sorry, I thought that was more commonly known.  He has sleep apnea.  His sleep study showed that his sleep was interrupted by breathing cessations about once a minute, which clearly means he wasn't getting sufficient sleep and certainly no REM sleep.  And I can tell you, he was one grumpy pain in the butt for a about a year.  The CPAP (actually he just got a new machine, and they're called APAP now, but no one's heard that so I used the old terminology) is a device that helps apnea sufferers breathe at night.  APAP stands for Automatic Positive Airway Pressure.  Ron wears a mask over his nose that looks a bit like an anesthesia mask, and it connects to the machine with a tube, and the machine basically blows air into his nose so he doesn't stop breathing.  The new machine is pretty cool, it can actually tell him how many sleep incidents (non-breathing incidents) he was, and it's gone from once a minute to one or two a night.  It can also detect when his mask isn't sealed correctly, and once he got that fixed, his sleep incidents basically went away.  It's nearly as cool as CIs, for a different health problem!  He even brings it on vacation, his old CPAP has been to England and France.  🙂
  25. Like
    Mary Featherston reacted to Kylie in First sound you heard today...a little fun   
    A podcast while I was getting dressed before the kids were up. Bliss!
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