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MallaRuth

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  1. Like
    MallaRuth reacted to Mary Featherston in Changes in Taste   
    I think it's important to point out, which Mary Beth did in a nice way, that it's not valid to extrapolate from a single data point.  I'm sorry that Paul is having trouble hearing  music and discerning pitch, but the conclusion that that will be the universal experience just isn't so.  I can tell when I'm out of tune.
  2. Like
    MallaRuth reacted to Mary Beth in Favorite around the ear BT headphones to use with Sonnet 2, Sonnet and OPUS2 BTE processors   
    @MallaRuth  what an awesome review!  I LOVE it when we share reviews of tech!
     
    I LOVE my BOSE QC35 around the ear headphones.  They are noise canceling for acoustic listeners.  The noise canceling feature is optimized for sound entering the ear canal.  With my OPUS2 BTE processors, sound enters the mic in the earhook.  So they do dampen noise for me but not as much as they do for Jill who has acoustic hearing.  They have terrific bass.  They are comfortable on flights.  On my right side, they never become uncomfortable.  On my left side, sometimes on long flights they do become uncomfortable and then I either place a thin piece of moleskin between the OPUS2 and my ear or pop the OPUS2 off my ear and let it rest in the headphone cup.  Be VERY careful when removing the headphones if you do this.  Sonnet processors have had problems twice for me when using these headphones on flights (one short flight and one long flight).  Somehow it messed up my Sonnet mics.  I don’t understand what happened but have heard it from another Sonnet user too.  The first time I thought it was a fluke.  After the second time, I will never use headphones on my Sonnets while flying.  Both times it happened to me, my processors had to be replaced.  So I fly with my trusty OPUS2 processors which have never had a problem with headphones.
    Does anyone else here use headphones?  What has been your experience using headphones with your processors?
  3. Like
    MallaRuth got a reaction from Mary Beth in Favorite around the ear BT headphones to use with Sonnet 2, Sonnet and OPUS2 BTE processors   
    Hi Mary Beth and all
    I have recently had my bilateral hearing restored after implant failure on the right side. To celebrate my return to stereo sound, I decided to treat myself to some over the ear headphones. I’ve never owned a pair before. I use the bluetooth earhook headphones. They provide decent stereo sound, cost around £20 and have lasted for four years. However, I fancied trying something a little snazzier that might provide a better overall acoustic experience. 
    After lots of research, I settled for a pair of Skullcandy headphones. I’d initially dismissed them as a trendy gimmick, but I tried out my sister’s Venue pair and the sound quality and fit were outstanding: https://www.skullcandy.co.uk/shop/headphones/bluetooth-headphones/venue
    I decided to try a different pair, and opted for the Crusher: https://www.skullcandy.co.uk/shop/headphones/bluetooth-headphones/crusher-wireless
    Verdict: I really like them, but they may not be for everybody. 
    Pros:
    They sit nicely on my head (for me) to be picked up by the Sonnet mics.  The sound is loud enough; I normally have the volume at around 2/3 the full volume.  They provide balanced and clear stereo sound across a range of genres including classical, jazz, as well as more poppy and rocky songs. My favourite classical tracks still sound full and sweet on these. I LOVE the tactile bass! Even when switched off, the headphones provide a lot of vibration and movement. I find them very immersive. For a song or a movie with bassy sound, I only have to switch the bass lever up a little and the headphones thrum and vibrate. It’s really fun. Cons:
    Some people may find them too bass heavy. All my family tried them, all liked them, with my dad commenting they were too bassy for him. This is a matter of personal preference, I think. They size up a little small, and some people may find them tight. I can wear them comfortably for a couple of hours. They’re not noise cancelling and do leak a little sound, however, not too much. 
      I’m really pleased that I dipped my toe in the water with OTE headphones, and I would definitely buy another pair.
  4. Like
    MallaRuth got a reaction from Mary Beth in Hi I’m newly implanted 10/15/19.   
    Hi Anita, welcome! I was recently implanted, too (2nd October, and activated on the 24th). It takes time to recover, for sure. I had around two weeks off work and went back to work last week. I did try to make some time to take short walks every day, even when I didn’t feel like it. I felt very tired and noticed myself moving much more slowly than usual even after I got back to work. I haven’t gone back to my regular hobbies yet, like exercise classes. I think it would be worth asking your audiologist or clinic about the taste issues. I hope that you feel better very soon - and the very best of luck with your activation!
  5. Like
    MallaRuth got a reaction from Mary Featherston in Reimplant after nineteen years   
    Hi everybody. Just thought I'd share my situation with you in case it's of interest.
    I'm a bilateral CI user, had right ear implanted in 2000 and LE in 2010. My RE failed this summer whilst I was on holiday in Rhodes. My implant (well, I thought it was my processor) started switching off at random. I changed batteries a few times, then (using my left processor for spares) I switched the wire, coil, battery pack one at a time. After randomly switching off, the implant would come back on maybe 10 minutes later with a staticky sounding popping nose. After half a day of this, it pretty much stopped coming on altogether. When I got home later that week, my clinic sent out a new processor and I went through the process again of testing all the spare parts, finally switching the processor itself over: no joy. I went for tests the following week.
    I had my reimplant surgery less than a month later, on Wednesday 2nd October. My activation is next Thursday. I am excited to get back to stereo... and I wonder how different this new implant will sound. I've gone from a COMBI 40+ with standard electrode to a Synchrony II, so quite an upgrade!
    I've always found my left ear to be the 'weak ear' due to the 10 year gap. Using only my left ear since August has really strengthened it, I reckon.
    I'd love to hear the experiences of others who have had long gaps in sequential implantation, or have had to rehab following a reimplant. I'll update this following my switch-on.
    Ruth 🙂
  6. Like
    MallaRuth got a reaction from Mary Beth in Reimplant after nineteen years   
    Thank you @Mary Beth! I am going to treat myself to a  swanky new pair of wireless headphones... They'll help with rehab, right?! 😉
  7. Like
    MallaRuth reacted to Mary Beth in Reimplant after nineteen years   
    @MallaRuth
    Will be thinking of you next Thursday when your right side welcomes you back to being bilateral my friend!
  8. Like
    MallaRuth got a reaction from Mary Beth in Reimplant after nineteen years   
    Hi everybody. Just thought I'd share my situation with you in case it's of interest.
    I'm a bilateral CI user, had right ear implanted in 2000 and LE in 2010. My RE failed this summer whilst I was on holiday in Rhodes. My implant (well, I thought it was my processor) started switching off at random. I changed batteries a few times, then (using my left processor for spares) I switched the wire, coil, battery pack one at a time. After randomly switching off, the implant would come back on maybe 10 minutes later with a staticky sounding popping nose. After half a day of this, it pretty much stopped coming on altogether. When I got home later that week, my clinic sent out a new processor and I went through the process again of testing all the spare parts, finally switching the processor itself over: no joy. I went for tests the following week.
    I had my reimplant surgery less than a month later, on Wednesday 2nd October. My activation is next Thursday. I am excited to get back to stereo... and I wonder how different this new implant will sound. I've gone from a COMBI 40+ with standard electrode to a Synchrony II, so quite an upgrade!
    I've always found my left ear to be the 'weak ear' due to the 10 year gap. Using only my left ear since August has really strengthened it, I reckon.
    I'd love to hear the experiences of others who have had long gaps in sequential implantation, or have had to rehab following a reimplant. I'll update this following my switch-on.
    Ruth 🙂
  9. Like
    MallaRuth got a reaction from Mary Beth in Music in true stereo options   
    This is great, Mary Beth! Thank you. I use the ear hooks and I am pretty satisfied with them. They are cheap, long lasting (I’ve had mine for around 4 years) and give very decent volume and sound quality. 
    It would be useful to consider cost and ease of sourcing something as part of this chart.
    I agree that using the telecoil can be highly inconvenient. This is made worse by needing the Finetuner, meaning that if I need to suddenly switch my program out so that I can hear properly, it’s a faff (e.g. getting on a bus and speaking to a driver). I also find I get a lot of electromagnetic interference. 
    I look forward to seeing what other stereo options people come up with!
  10. Like
    MallaRuth got a reaction from Mary Beth in Remote- volume and sensitivity adjustment   
    Apologies for the late reply - I didn't get the email notification. I have tried to turn them on. Yes, this is exactly what happened to my Sonnets. It's happened twice, once on each side. Both times, the entire unit had to be replaced. I was told this is a weakness with that model. 
  11. Like
    MallaRuth got a reaction from Mary Beth in Bilateral struggles and voice   
    Hi All - I am messaging because I have an ongoing problem with trying to 1) even up my hearing and 2) get comfortable with the sound of my own voice. It's at the stage where it's causing problems on a daily basis.
    I've had my right CI (RCI) for 20 years and my LCI for 10. I got upgraded to the Sonnet on both sides last year. 
    I've always found my LCI much quieter than my RCI. That's to be expected because the RCI has had a 10 year head start and so is going to be much more dominant. Although I've had the RCI turned down and the LCI turned up over the years, they've never evened out and they probably never will. However, I DO hear much, much better when I'm wearing two, even if I don't have true stereo sound (what does true stereo sound even sound like? I'm not sure if I know...)
    One thing I'm particularly struggling with is hearing my voice comfortably with both CIs. This got much, much worse last year so the point where I frequently switch off my LCI when I'm giving talks or presentations. I get really distracted and self-conscious. My voice sounds muffled and uneven, as though it's stuck in my head when I talk. With just my RCI, it sounds much clearer and as though I'm getting proper resonant feedback when I project it.
    This could either be related to getting my Sonnets, or to having voice coaching, both of which I got at the same time last year. I have been deaf all my life and developed a habit of talking quite far back in the throat (pharyngeal speech). With my better hearing and awareness, I am working on projecting properly and speaking clearly, and listening to myself as I talk rather than feeling the speech. Perhaps this heightened awareness and better hearing has made me more aware of what I'm doing wrong, although I have to add that I have always been self-conscious about my voice. I have never had to take a processor off when speaking, however.
    That's all a bit long and rambly - sorry! I would so appreciate any insights that this wonderful group is able to share - thank you.
  12. Like
    MallaRuth reacted to Hicksy in The Public Library   
    I would like to point out the Public Library as a great resource for many that I feel hasn’t been mentioned enough on this site.
    As a kid, I grew up in a small town far removed from the city and quickly found the local library as a great way to learn and pass the time. I became a bookworm. When I grew older, I moved to the city and due to job demands, family commitments and the fast paced life of city living, I abandoned the library mainly due to time constraints. I never lost my love of reading however and spent a fortune on books.
    I no longer live in the big city but in a fairly large town. Once implanted, I decided to visit my local library in hopes they provide audiobooks as I quickly grew tired of the repetitiveness of Angel Sounds etc... I imagined a shelf of audiobooks in C.D. form and that is what I found. But I was also introduced to the world of e-books and audiobooks offered online through simply having a library card. What a revelation this was. I visited the library twice, once to sign up and take out an audiobook and once to return the audiobook. Since then, I have done everything online. 
    Most times I’m lucky enough to take out both the audiobook and the e-book to read along. I am allowed to have the books for 21 days with the option to renew but I find this is sufficient for my needs. I understand that a busy working person may find this too short as it does take time to get through an audiobook.
    The selection at my library is absolutely huge. Three of my favourite authors (Lee Child, David Baldacci and Michael Connelly) are releasing new books next month and I already have the three pre-reserved as e-books and two as audiobooks. Nevertheless, if they don’t sync up, my library gives the option to see “what’s available” so I search the available audiobook selections and usually find the corresponding e-book available as well. Simply amazing and a real money saver for sure. And a great training aid as well!
    Sadly, I realize this may not be available to everyone, but if you don’t make the effort to see what is offered at your local library,  you may be missing out on a great resource!
  13. Like
    MallaRuth reacted to Vera in Recommendations for hearing therapy in (south) London   
    Hello Joseph.
    I live in Skipton, in northern England.  I’d go to my GP or indeed to the nearest Cochlear Implant Centre and explain the problem.  The National Health Service is the provider for almost all CI users here.  They run regular follow up services for us, after the initial year of rehab is over, usually to see an audiologist once a year for a check/remap if necessary etc.  I don’t think there is a limit to this in terms of numbers of years since the implant.  I have a friend who moved from a different part of the U.K. after getting her CI and she just transferred to the nearest centre after she moved.  I don’t see why that wouldn’t be the case for someone who got their implant in another country.
    I know you said you didn’t want to burden the NHS but, given that almost all of us have implants paid for by the NHS, I don’t think there is an infrastructure of private audiologists specialising in CIs that you might find in other countries.
    You could also contact the National Cochlear Implant Users Association and ask them or indeed contact the MEDEL U.K. people in Sheffield, who I’ve always found enormously helpful and supportive.
    Good luck.
    Vera
     
     
  14. Like
    MallaRuth reacted to Mary Featherston in Recommendations for hearing therapy in (south) London   
    @Daniel the Stranger and @Joseph it wouldn't have occurred to me to think about the impact of getting your CIs in a country and a language that's not your native ones in either case. 
    I will say, though, that I have an enormous amount of respect for you guys - not just the CI rehab, but even moving to a new country and living with communicating in a new language.  I've spent quite a lot of time in Spain, and quite a lot of time in Israel too, and though I was reasonably proficient, if not fluent, in Spanish at the time (it was  a long time ago and most of my vocabulary has, like Elvis, left the building, as I'm reminded every time my friend Jose Miguel posts on my Facebook page) but I could understand.  But that's a far cry from being able to communicate on a level that would make me employable, and adding CI rehab to the mix - well, you guys, as I said, you have my respect.
  15. Like
    MallaRuth reacted to Mary Beth in MED-EL 2.4 GHz digital wireless technology alternatives   
    @Helgeo
    I am anxious too for direct 2.4 connectivity with the Sonnet’s built in receiver.
    There has been almost no news on the AudioLink intermediary device that Med-El gave vouchers for in Europe years ago.  However Med-El is still extending their trademark in the US on that device so maybe it is still being developed.
    Now that Cochlear has direct from iOS devices for all audio to their N7 processor and AB announced the plan to expand SWORD for direct from all BT phones for phone audio only to their Naida processor, I am hoping Med-El will skip the need for an intermediary device (AudioLink) and develop WORLD’S FIRST direct to ALL cellphones for ALL audio.  This is on my Med-El wishlist.  ( @MED-EL Moderator ).
     
  16. Like
    MallaRuth reacted to Jewel in Sonnet mic covers - again!   
    You know I just changed my mic covers for the first time on NYD and I think the sound quality isn't as good as it was with the original mic cover I was using since activation in September. I found it strange. My hair doesn't bother the mic cover though. 
  17. Like
    MallaRuth reacted to Mary Beth in Sonnet mic covers - again!   
    @MallaRuth  Yup.  I experienced the same thing.  Sometimes this works.  
    I take apart the Sonnet....
    separate DL-coil from cable
    separate cable from Sonnet
    remove battery cover
    remove battery pack or rechargeable battery adapter
    remove battery
     
    Wait a bit.  Put it all back together again.
     
    You described one of several sound quality issues that frustrate me with the Sonnets.  My OPUS2 and Rondo processors consistently sound the same all the time.  My Sonnets are not as consistent.
  18. Like
    MallaRuth reacted to Mary Featherston in Sonnet mic covers - again!   
    I got a haircut last night and had the stylist cut the hair even shorter than usual.  Nothing's causing friction on my processor!  But I know a lot of women don't like short hair.  Have you tried the Ear Gear covers?  I used them once or twice to reduce wind, and I think they'd stop the hair rubbing too.
  19. Like
    MallaRuth reacted to Ford in Seeking Implanted Musicians...   
    Hi All -- I am a professional jazz guitarist/bassist and am getting first Med-El CI implant surgery on Tuesday in my left ear. My right ear has profound SN loss too but I have been practicing guitar of late plugging my left ear completely and using HA in my right ear only (to see what that's like in case it is a long path to hearing with the CI). I can still hear enough to play reasonably well with only the right ear....though pitch discrimination has been getting more difficult as time passes.
    I will be working hard to rehabilitate my left ear with the CI to hopefully improve my musical hearing overall but am setting expectations low. Hoping that my 40 years of music experience may help the process.  I would be interested in continuing this thread and will post my impressions as they evolve.
    Thanks for the thread 🙂
     
    Ford
  20. Like
    MallaRuth got a reaction from Mary Beth in Seeking Implanted Musicians...   
    Hi @Geoff Read! I love live music also. I attend a lot of concerts, mainly classical. I enjoyed Messiah at York Minster (UK) very much. The resonance of the enormous choir and orchestra in that amazing space (all the stone) was incredible. I play a woodwind instrument (clarinet) and enjoy woodwind concerts as well. These instruments in particular are very resonant. I think the spaces in which such concerts take place is really important. The last woodwind concert I went to was at my old university, and the concert hall is set up in a way that maximises acoustics, with a round angular shape and lots of wood. You can see the interior here: https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=jack+lyons+concert+hall+york&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiIz8mRt9bfAhW8SBUIHSduA54Q_AUIDygC&biw=1536&bih=723
    I will let you know when the proceedings from the Music and Cochlear Implants symposium are published. There were many interesting talks, and one covered what makes music so satisfying to listen to (factors like harmony, melody, suspense, emotion, timbre) which you may be able to correlate with live music experiences. The next symposium will be in 2020 - perhaps you should suggest a session topic! I found that many of the researchers were surprised by how much we CI participants enjoyed (and were competent in reading/playing) music... http://www.implantsandmusic.net/
    Another note (I work in academic publishing). You can retrieve a lot of peer-reviewed academic literature for free these days. Try sites like http://gettheresearch.org/ or https://unpaywall.org/
  21. Like
    MallaRuth got a reaction from Mary Beth in Stories of when your batteries ran out   
    I don't think there is anything wrong with the set. I get up at 6am and go to bed at 11pm. That's 17 hours. I get less than the advertised time of 8-10 hours because I use the bluetooth neckloop a lot. If they do run out twice in a day, then it tends to be at night when I'm watching the TV. Sods law dictates that my batteries are always in another room! I rarely wear clothes with pockets, so it's difficult to always keep the batteries on me.
  22. Like
    MallaRuth got a reaction from Mary Beth in Stories of when your batteries ran out   
    I'm the same as Mary Beth with needing to change the batteries twice a day most days. It's inconvenient, and not pleasant going through your day knowing they'll run out at random points. The rechargeables are very easy to swap, though (much easier than the fiddly disposables). I too get nervous swapping them too soon because of not being left with spares - I get through all six batteries most days. It's a great idea to store/carry the disposables plus adaptors as backup. I want to go back to disposables FT but unfortunately my clinic will not support this.
  23. Like
    MallaRuth reacted to Mary Featherston in Stories of when your batteries ran out   
    My batteries tend to run out just as I leave work, or in the car on the way home, depending on how early I get up and how late I work.  But I keep the spares in my pocket so it's not an issue.
  24. Like
    MallaRuth got a reaction from Mary Beth in Stories of when your batteries ran out   
    I have two implants and usually the batteries run out at the same time or one after the other. I have Sonnets with rechargeables, and get around 7-8 hours of use.
    Recently, my right (stronger) ear ran out whilst I was taking questions from a large group of researchers after giving a lecture. I couldn't hear very well at all but managed to fudge some answers, albeit with some slightly bemused looks! In the end, I had to confess, and my colleague took over so that I could go get my batteries! They were all very lovely about it.
    A much more common scenario is being in the armchair on an evening, watching TV. This is the time my batteries usually run out for the second time in a day. I'm usually feeling too lazy to go get my batteries so I might carry on as I am, using one ear or relying on the subtitles, until my husband starts asking me if I want a cup of tea then realises I can't hear him... 😄 
  25. Like
    MallaRuth got a reaction from Mary Featherston in Stories of when your batteries ran out   
    I have two implants and usually the batteries run out at the same time or one after the other. I have Sonnets with rechargeables, and get around 7-8 hours of use.
    Recently, my right (stronger) ear ran out whilst I was taking questions from a large group of researchers after giving a lecture. I couldn't hear very well at all but managed to fudge some answers, albeit with some slightly bemused looks! In the end, I had to confess, and my colleague took over so that I could go get my batteries! They were all very lovely about it.
    A much more common scenario is being in the armchair on an evening, watching TV. This is the time my batteries usually run out for the second time in a day. I'm usually feeling too lazy to go get my batteries so I might carry on as I am, using one ear or relying on the subtitles, until my husband starts asking me if I want a cup of tea then realises I can't hear him... 😄 
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