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Kylie

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  1. Like
    Kylie reacted to Mary Featherston in What is your favorite way to listen to recorded music?   
    Oh, lots.  Classic rock, folk, bluegrass, jazz.  Classical, but I tend not to listen to that in the car, it's generally longer than my commute and I don't think it would impress people if I insisted in sitting in the parking lot until Ma Vlast was done.  The last couple of days I've had two alternating earworms:  One Hand, One Heart from West Side Story (and I blame @Kyliefor that) and "It's a Long Way from Amphioxus".  I can sing "Hatikvah" in Hebrew and "Suo Gan" in Welsh (really badly, I don't have a good singing voice)
    You? 
  2. Like
    Kylie got a reaction from Mary Beth in Newly diagnosed SSD, trying to decide whats best   
    I also had sudden SSD. I chose the cochlear implant because I wanted stereo sound and the highest quality outcome including music listening. I have been very happy with the results, which are continuing to improve at 18 months on. It was very functional from an early stage.
    I do not completely understand some of the options you mentioned as they were not options for me but others can comment on some specifics there.
  3. Like
    Kylie got a reaction from Megan L. in Evaluating CI for Single-Sided Deafness - would appreciate your advice   
    Hi @PamR
    Sorry for the delayed response, haven't checked my notifications for a whole week while I was moving house!
    Anyway... I also became SSD suddenly, at age 38, following an ear infection.
    I also found it affected my orientation, not hearing people behind me (very off putting when surprised and hard for my kids who weren't heard unless they were face to face). And it affected my enjoyment of all noisy environments, which I started avoiding. I rescheduled all my catch ups to quiet coffees at home or at an outdoor cafe. Weddings and funerals were a hearing nightmare - too many people in a small space plus background music. And I am a singer in a vocal group so hearing and performing music was very difficult and depressing. The list could go on couldn't it! 
    CI was the only option recommended to me so I took it! I was willing to risk the surgery for any improvement at all. And it has been fabulous. I am 1.5 years post surgery and all the things mentioned above are better now!! I have the sonnet 1. I wear it every waking minute and wouldn't be without it. My new sound is not exactly like my previous hearing but it is functional and amazing and better than I imagined. Including for music.
    You ask what advice we would offer? Do endless research beforehand so you are the most informed about the process, how the CI works, and the range of outcomes possible. Talk to people who have done it (like this forum!) If you do go ahead, be optimistic in your mindset to set yourself up for success. Do your rehab practise. Tell everyone in your life what you're doing so they can support you. Keep talking on this forum for more support!
  4. Thanks
    Kylie reacted to Megan L. in October HearPeers Virtual Coffee Chat   
    @Kylie
    Love your choir’s music!! Thanks for the channel, already subscribed 🤩 Looking forward to hearing more songs!!
     
  5. Like
    Kylie reacted to Mary Featherston in October HearPeers Virtual Coffee Chat   
    Thanks for the choir channel, @Kylie! 
    Also, I meant to say when we were talking about the Artone neckloop that I often leave my office and walk to the printer, in another room while on calls.  I can hear, but can't speak, of course, but it's kind of cool to walk into another room and still know what's going on.
  6. Thanks
    Kylie reacted to Mary Beth in October HearPeers Virtual Coffee Chat   
    @Kylie
    I subscribed to your choir’s YouTube channel!  
     
    Your group is terrific and I love the music selections!
  7. Like
    Kylie got a reaction from Megan L. in October HearPeers Virtual Coffee Chat   
    Link to my choir's channel, as discussed...  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZY6W1sKj6_s7cFep-ntorg/videos
  8. Like
    Kylie got a reaction from Joan in October HearPeers Virtual Coffee Chat   
    Link to my choir's channel, as discussed...  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZY6W1sKj6_s7cFep-ntorg/videos
  9. Like
    Kylie got a reaction from Mary Beth in October HearPeers Virtual Coffee Chat   
    Link to my choir's channel, as discussed...  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZY6W1sKj6_s7cFep-ntorg/videos
  10. Like
    Kylie got a reaction from Mary Beth in October HearPeers Virtual Coffee Chat   
    @Kirk S.
    Good luck Kirk! Will be thinking of you.
  11. Sad
    Kylie reacted to Kirk S. in October HearPeers Virtual Coffee Chat   
    Hi Mary Beth. Just a quick heads up that unfortunately won’t be able to attend the HearPeers Virtual Coffee Chat next weekend. I had a hearing test and appointment with my otolaryngologist today and the results were so bad that he ordered me straight into the hospital. It appears that my left-side hearing (the “good side”) suddenly crashed badly over the weekend (after beginning to weaken a couple weeks ago) and my doctor wants me in the hospital straightaway for daily tests, observation, treatment, etc. Maybe surgery, too. He said I should plan on being in the hospital at least a couple weeks. He said he and his team still haven’t been able to figure out what’s wrong (probably several things at once) but he said it’s clear that my hearing is steadily weakening and that we need to do something different. As you may recall, I’ve been taking Prednisone (cortico-steroids, as I’m sure you know) for quite a while and that seems to have helped, but my doctor said today that that approach appears to be at the end of it’s usefulness. Ironically, my cool new Rondo 2 still hasn’t proved effective yet and the COVID-19 crisis has delayed my plans to visit the States to work with experienced, English-speaking audiologists to get that sorted out. So I’m kind of between a rock and hard place. But my doctor and his team are considered the best in Japan and I have full faith in them (especially since the folks at MEEI have endorsed everything they’ve done so far) and they work with Med-El all the time, so I’m sure they’ll sort things out eventually. In the meantime, Japanese hospitals are not bad: well run, well staffed, good food. Can’t complain. I’ll let you know how things work out. In the meantime, please give my best to all at the HPVCC next week! Best, Kirk
  12. Like
    Kylie reacted to Mary Beth in It’s like Christmas in September!   
    @Jewel
    It looks like a special battery cover for Sonnet 1 and 2.  (Kind of like the Roger 21 special battery cover.)
     
    @Joan
    Med-El says it is only for Sonnet 1 & 2.
  13. Like
    Kylie reacted to Mary Beth in It’s like Christmas in September!   
    @Joan
    @Tracey_66
    @Dave in Pittsburgh
    @Jewel
    We were just talking about wanting this!
  14. Like
    Kylie reacted to Jewel in It’s like Christmas in September!   
    This is great! Is it a mic cover? @Mary Beth
  15. Like
    Kylie reacted to Mary Beth in October HearPeers Virtual Coffee Chat   
    Sunday October 18
    9:30 am New York time start time
    chat opens at 9:15 for socializing 
    Google Meet with free live captioning
    All are welcome. Smile 
    If you are interested in joining in, just reply here so you are included in the email invite.
     
    Who wants to receive an email invite?
     
    So far invites are going to:  
    @Kirk S.
    @Megan L.
    @Jewel
    @Tracey_66
    @Kylie
    @Joan
    @Mary Featherston
    @Valentin
    @Mary Beth
    @Dave in Pittsburgh
    @phobos512
    @Nikki
     
    @artkup will be joining for the first time 
    @KittKatz will be joining for the first time 
     
     
    Do the following people want to receive an invite this month?
    @Marion nancy
    @Neil
    @Watersail
     
    Are any other members interested in joining in for the first time?
  16. Like
    Kylie got a reaction from Mary Beth in Cochlear implant for single sided deafness   
    I also have single sided deafness, and have had great results so far (18 months.)  My hearing is well balanced with the 2 different ears, the brain is amazing at putting it together to make 1 sound. Though when I listen with 1 ear at a time the sounds are definitely different. Also my tinnitus has reduced too! That seems to be a common happy side effect.
  17. Like
    Kylie got a reaction from Mary Beth in October HearPeers Virtual Coffee Chat   
    Yes please!
  18. Like
    Kylie got a reaction from Mary Beth in Do you use a dry kit? Which one?   
    I've got the dry star
  19. Like
    Kylie reacted to PamR in Evaluating CI for Single-Sided Deafness - would appreciate your advice   
    Thank you all for sharing your experiences and advice. I have finished all the pre-surgery tests and want to move forward - now its up to my doctor and insurance to sort out - hopefully insurance will approve the surgery and I’ll be on my way to better hearing!
  20. Like
    Kylie got a reaction from Jewel in Evaluating CI for Single-Sided Deafness - would appreciate your advice   
    Hi @PamR
    Sorry for the delayed response, haven't checked my notifications for a whole week while I was moving house!
    Anyway... I also became SSD suddenly, at age 38, following an ear infection.
    I also found it affected my orientation, not hearing people behind me (very off putting when surprised and hard for my kids who weren't heard unless they were face to face). And it affected my enjoyment of all noisy environments, which I started avoiding. I rescheduled all my catch ups to quiet coffees at home or at an outdoor cafe. Weddings and funerals were a hearing nightmare - too many people in a small space plus background music. And I am a singer in a vocal group so hearing and performing music was very difficult and depressing. The list could go on couldn't it! 
    CI was the only option recommended to me so I took it! I was willing to risk the surgery for any improvement at all. And it has been fabulous. I am 1.5 years post surgery and all the things mentioned above are better now!! I have the sonnet 1. I wear it every waking minute and wouldn't be without it. My new sound is not exactly like my previous hearing but it is functional and amazing and better than I imagined. Including for music.
    You ask what advice we would offer? Do endless research beforehand so you are the most informed about the process, how the CI works, and the range of outcomes possible. Talk to people who have done it (like this forum!) If you do go ahead, be optimistic in your mindset to set yourself up for success. Do your rehab practise. Tell everyone in your life what you're doing so they can support you. Keep talking on this forum for more support!
  21. Like
    Kylie got a reaction from PamR in Evaluating CI for Single-Sided Deafness - would appreciate your advice   
    Hi @PamR
    Sorry for the delayed response, haven't checked my notifications for a whole week while I was moving house!
    Anyway... I also became SSD suddenly, at age 38, following an ear infection.
    I also found it affected my orientation, not hearing people behind me (very off putting when surprised and hard for my kids who weren't heard unless they were face to face). And it affected my enjoyment of all noisy environments, which I started avoiding. I rescheduled all my catch ups to quiet coffees at home or at an outdoor cafe. Weddings and funerals were a hearing nightmare - too many people in a small space plus background music. And I am a singer in a vocal group so hearing and performing music was very difficult and depressing. The list could go on couldn't it! 
    CI was the only option recommended to me so I took it! I was willing to risk the surgery for any improvement at all. And it has been fabulous. I am 1.5 years post surgery and all the things mentioned above are better now!! I have the sonnet 1. I wear it every waking minute and wouldn't be without it. My new sound is not exactly like my previous hearing but it is functional and amazing and better than I imagined. Including for music.
    You ask what advice we would offer? Do endless research beforehand so you are the most informed about the process, how the CI works, and the range of outcomes possible. Talk to people who have done it (like this forum!) If you do go ahead, be optimistic in your mindset to set yourself up for success. Do your rehab practise. Tell everyone in your life what you're doing so they can support you. Keep talking on this forum for more support!
  22. Thanks
    Kylie reacted to Mary Beth in Evaluating CI for Single-Sided Deafness - would appreciate your advice   
    @Kylie
    congrats on the new house!
  23. Like
    Kylie got a reaction from Mary Beth in Evaluating CI for Single-Sided Deafness - would appreciate your advice   
    Hi @PamR
    Sorry for the delayed response, haven't checked my notifications for a whole week while I was moving house!
    Anyway... I also became SSD suddenly, at age 38, following an ear infection.
    I also found it affected my orientation, not hearing people behind me (very off putting when surprised and hard for my kids who weren't heard unless they were face to face). And it affected my enjoyment of all noisy environments, which I started avoiding. I rescheduled all my catch ups to quiet coffees at home or at an outdoor cafe. Weddings and funerals were a hearing nightmare - too many people in a small space plus background music. And I am a singer in a vocal group so hearing and performing music was very difficult and depressing. The list could go on couldn't it! 
    CI was the only option recommended to me so I took it! I was willing to risk the surgery for any improvement at all. And it has been fabulous. I am 1.5 years post surgery and all the things mentioned above are better now!! I have the sonnet 1. I wear it every waking minute and wouldn't be without it. My new sound is not exactly like my previous hearing but it is functional and amazing and better than I imagined. Including for music.
    You ask what advice we would offer? Do endless research beforehand so you are the most informed about the process, how the CI works, and the range of outcomes possible. Talk to people who have done it (like this forum!) If you do go ahead, be optimistic in your mindset to set yourself up for success. Do your rehab practise. Tell everyone in your life what you're doing so they can support you. Keep talking on this forum for more support!
  24. Like
    Kylie reacted to Jdashiell in Music wit CIs   
    Here is my interview with Jon Leibman of For Bass players only. 
     
    Bass grooving (despite hearing loss)
     
    “The thing about the bass is that it’s felt. I can feel it booming!”
     
    By Jon Liebman
    Week of August 3, 2020
     
    Since launching For Bass Players Only back in 2009, I’ve interviewed close to 700 bass players. While every interview offers unique insights into playing bass and learning bass, every once in a while I get an interview that truly moves me. This week’s interview with Joe Dashiell marks one of those instances.
     
    Joe grew up in Oregon and, like most teens in the ‘60s and ‘70s, was into the rock music of the day. He formed a garage band with some buddies and, as the bass player, found himself influenced by Jack Bruce and John Paul Jones. Joe never made a career of music, but just enjoyed playing.
     
    Selling his Fender Precision upon entering college, Joe didn’t pick up a bass again until he was well into his 50s. Now he plays all the time and just loves it. 
     
    What makes the story so special is that Joe is stone deaf.
     
    Joe started losing his hearing in his late 30s. Now he can hear only with the aid of two cochlear implants. “When I got my first cochlear implant,” Joe says, “the very first thing I heard, music, listening to it in the car, was the bass line.”
     
    The feeling was incredibly exciting to Joe. “As a bass player, I really enjoyed that!” he continues. “That was so amazing to me that some of the very first sounds I heard were the bass. And I was able to recognize the song. It was a Beatles song, so I knew it. That was pretty cool.”
     
    Since becoming a member of For Bass Players Only, Joe has been able to find so more joy and fulfillment in the ability to learn bass and play music. He’s especially fond of the Scales & Theory and Blues courses inside the membership. “I get a lot out of it,” he says. “I still have a long way to go with the information that you provide, but it has really made a huge difference to me and my ability to play.”
     
    How wonderful is it that, at least in at least come instances, music can be enjoyed and appreciated by the deaf and the hard of hearing community. And as for the bass, the vibrations make our instrument among the most prominent!
     
    “The thing about the bass is that it’s felt,” says Joe. “I could feel it booming. I’m really thankful that I can hear music and play it while I’m listening to it. That’s really good!”
     
    Way to go, Joe. Keep on groovin’!
     
    How about you? Have a thought on the subject? Leave a comment below and let me know what you think. In the meantime, you can check out my interview with Joe here:
     
    https://forbassplayersonly.com/joe-dashiell/
  25. Like
    Kylie reacted to Diane in Implant for single-sided deafness   
    @Kylie Thanks so much for sharing your experiences!
    The doctor that told me I wouldn’t like the implant didn’t seem to have much experience with single-sided deafness....the other surgeon and audiologist from Columbia definitely did, so I just wanted to throw that question out there on this forum.  
    Which implant/processor do you have?  I am reading through all the different information on the different types trying to figure out what would be best for me... its a bit overwhelming. 
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