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  1. I’m a 69 year old male who has had SSD since 1995. The doctors were never able to tell me why I lost my hearing, just that it wasn’t coming back and hearing aids would not help. I recently signed up for Medicare and discovered that they might pay for an implant. I was evaluated a week ago and qualified. In a quiet environment, I got 5% of the words correct. In a noisy environment I got 0% correct. These were both through my bad ear only. When using both ears the the numbers were significantly higher, but not as high as one might think. I’ve had the CT scan and everything was nominal. Next up is a visit with the surgeon where we will pick the brand and model of the implant.
  2. Eric in Tulsa

    Long term SSD

    I have had a single sided hearing loss since 1995. The loss was sudden and occurred while I was awake. The doctors were never able to determine what caused it, only that I lost 40% of my hearing in that ear and 100% of the comprehension in that ear. When I hear words spoken in that ear, they sound just like any other noise. Hearing aids do nothing but amplify the noise. I’ve tried CROS hearing aids, but they only confused me. People would speak to me on my bad ear side and I would turn my back on them thinking they were on the other side. My comprehension got better, but it wasn’t worth the cost. I recently went on Medicare and suddenly, I had a solution to my problem that would be paid for by insurance. Medicare covers 80% of a Cochlear Implant and my Medicare Supplemental Policy covers the other 20%. ive had the evaluation at the audiologist and she said that I qualify. I then had the CT Scan and it was verified as nominal. Next up is an appointment with the surgeon on August 16. I’m armed with about 20 questions to ask at that appointment. Among other things, we will be selecting the manufacturer of the implant. pat this point I’m leaning toward Cochlear because of its iPhone compatibility. But I keep thinking of the longer electrode on the MedEl. Does it give me lower frequencies with the longer electrode? Would I miss those frequencies if I didn’t get the MedEl? I signed up on this forum to try and Lear what I don’t even know to ask. I’m in Tulsa OK. My surgeon will be Dr Voth with St Francis Warren Clinic ENT. IM A 69 year old male who has SSD in one ear and a slight loss in the other ear. I also have tinnitus 24/7 in the bad ear. I’m hoping the CI will help with that. Any information that you care to impart on me will be gladly received.
  3. Top line review: this is the accessory I've been waiting for! Super easy streaming that I always have with me. Sounds perfect! I'm streaming with it for several hours a day, whereas I rarely hook up my cable and gave up on the Roger Pen long ago. I still have some things on my wishlist, but this knocks out most of them. Not sure the price, but if it's inline with some of their other accessories and I had to pay for it, I'd definitely spend the money. Pros: Streaming that you always have with you, no other accessories needed. No. Wires. Streams from all apps on the iPhone/iPad. Connection is generally rock solid, range is good - still works 30 feet/10 meters away from my phone with a wall in between Audio quality is very good, on par with Direct Audio Cord, much better than AudioLink or Roger! Audio level goes as high as DAC streaming. Not that big, same size or slightly smaller than DAC cover or Roger cover. Will keep it on all the time. Battery life seems about the same (my routine is off working from home "these days", so I can't say for sure) Can actually stream at the same time as the AudioLink! (Yes two simultaneous streams!) So I use the AudioLink to stream from my computer (audio cable from computer to AudioLink, not Bluetooth) Cons/could be better: Doesn't stream from my Mac. Doesn't use Sonnet (1 or 2) mics for phone calls, uses the phone's mics. Sometimes needs to be power cycled to reconnect to phone if they've been "apart" for a bit. Quickly reconnects though. My Sonnet mics are still on while streaming, audiologist couldn't find option to turn them off while streaming, and I don't see a software option. Would be nice if iPhone's quick access Hearing Device controls in Control Center could change Sonnet settings and presets. Still need to use AudioKey 2 app or remote. Narrative: I was lucky enough to time a processor upgrade to pretty much the exact day AudioStream became available. I think MedEl actually slowed things down so that the timing would be right! It arrived Tuesday last week along with all my other new gear - the whole box was the size of a microwave! The AudioStream itself was in one of the small accessory boxes, like a battery cover or mic cover. It included the AudioStream itself and a new battery frame for disposables. The battery frame is marked with a tiny "fan"/wifi icon and it is imperceptibly shorter than the old frame. I tried sliding the AudioStream over my old battery on my (old) Sonnet, and it almost fit, but there's still a >1mm gap. I use rechargeables, so I had to open the new set of rechargables that came with my upgrade and grab the new RCB frame (also marked with a fan/wifi symbol) - I swear, it's impossible to tell the difference to the old one. So note: if you use rechargables and get the AudioStream, beg and plead for a new rechargable battery frame, or suck it up and buy one. Once I got the batteries sorted out, I got started setting up on my old Sonnet. So... my situation with my iPhone is... unique... let's leave it at that. I'm 99% sure you won't run into the issues I had. (Oh! I have no idea how any of this works on Android! )Once I retried on my iPad (and later back on my iPhone with things cleaned up), I got the proper experience. I installed the AudioKey 2 app, launched it, signed in with my MedEl account (account registration requires a processor serial # to verify you are a recipient). Allow Bluetooth (obviously) and Location Services (for "Find My Processor") when prompted. Once you're in, you can then bypass everything else and click the 🍔"hamburger"/menu button in the upper left, and choose "Connectivity Options". Click "AudioStream" > "Configuration" > Pick Left or Right, then Next. Slide the AudioStream onto the processor to power up, hold close to the iPhone/iPad, and click Next. Patiently wait, you may have to retry the power up, scan step (I did). You'll be prompted for a name – in iPhone settings this becomes "<name>'s hearing device", so just give it a short simple name (I think it's max 8 characters). Now wait again... this part also timed out on me on some of my reconfiguration attempts. You'll be prompted for a "pairing request", click Accept! It'll say "success". At this point, you *should* be ready to go. Back on the "Configure/Update/Reset" page, don't bother with "Update" at this time, I assume the v1.0 firmware is up-to-date. OK, time to stream... I had some music queued up, so I swiped down to get Control Center, and noticed my volume control had an Ear icon in it. When I pressed play, there was a delay, and the Ear icon went back to a Speaker icon, and the playback was paused. On my iPad, I pressed play again, and it hesitated, the Ear icon came back, I heard a faint "thunk" from my processor, and the streaming began! So from first setup, it may take a few seconds for the system to get everything setup to stream. Be patient. On my finicky iPhone, it wouldn't work straight away. Maybe I wasn't patient enough. I had to go to "Settings" > "Accessibility" > "Hearing Devices" and wait while it briefly scanned for devices. "Justin's Hearing Dev." appeared, cycled through a few different statuses and finally was "Connected". Tapping on "Justin's Hearing Dev." gives me a page with an option to "Stream to right hearing device" which should be on by default. At this point, streaming/listening to audio worked! In regular use it mostly "just works". If I haven't been streaming for a while, it usually starts streaming again without issue. But sometimes the audio won't start - seems this happens when the AudioStream and phone lose connection for a bit due to turning off Bluetooth or physical separation. It'll think it's connected, but it's not. Powercycling the AudioStream solves the problem, but a handful of times I need to powercycle twice. Reconnection can be immediate, or sometimes it takes a few seconds. What do I use it for? I'm streaming podcasts and web radio stations to it while I work and do chores. I used to want to do this, but hated setting up and tangling with the DAC cord, now it's just a few taps on my phone. I use it to watch YouTube videos (usually don't need captions) without bothering my wife and searching for headphones. I'll probably listen to more spoken content this way than any other moving forward - it's so convenient and I get rehab at the same time! I listen to music (mostly for the rehab benefit). I've tried some Zoom/WebEx calls, works great but my good ear is much better suited for that. I'm SSD, and phone calls are infinitely easier and less annoying to the other person if I use my good ear. But I have tried a few calls and it seems to work well. Just have to remember to keep the phone close because it's using the phone's mics. On one call, I tried to switch audio to NOT use the AudioStream, but it kept toggling back to the AudioStream. I think this is an iPhone bug not AudioStream. Another cool iPhone feature is "Live Listen" (I'll explain in another post how to set it up). This feature streams the iPhone's microphones to the AudioStream, and can be quickly accessed from Control Center. The audio pickup streamed this way is amazing! It can really amplify sounds, and background noise is greatly suppressed. It's like having a zoom lens for sound. It blows away the quality of audio from the AudioLink remote mic... by a lot! There is a slight delay however, and since the Sonnet mics are still active, it's a bit like an echo. Perhaps it'd be best to turn the mic sensitivity all the way down if you want to use this feature. Or hopefully MedEl can give us a way to control the audio/mic mix from the AudioKey 2 app. I won't use this feature a lot, since I have one good ear, but maybe I will find a use for it - it's fun and impressive to play with though! Anything else?! Physically, it's a little big, but I don't notice at all. I have a large head with proportional ears, so it's still hiding behind my ear lobe. I don't have to look at it! For the benefit it gives, I'll trade-off anyone else's opinion of how it looks. It doesn't add perceptibly to the weight of my processor. I'll be wearing it 99% of the time vs regular battery cover. Alright, I've said a lot (way too much). Let's conclude: It's awesome, I love it, you should totally get one! I don't know what it costs since I got it as the connectivity option on my upgrade. But if I were to pay out of pocket, say it was in the ballpark of $500 - I would absolutely spend that to have this. That might be a good chunk of money, but I've been waiting and dreaming of having something like this since before I got my implant!
  4. I’m in evaluation for CI for single-sided deafness - sudden idiopathic hearing loss in May 2017 and another major loss in Dec 2019 - only 28% word recognition now and significant tinnitus in bad ear. The other ear is fine. So far, I’m told I am a good candidate for the procedure. I’ve had excellent hearing all my life until these events at age 64. I enjoy travel for work and pleasure and twice in the past two years I have been surprised by persons who touch/grabbed me inappropriately - once on the street in California and another time in India - I am a strong person, but it frightened me to know that I could easily be accosted without any awareness of where the threat was coming because I could not hear the approach. I enjoyed music, social gatherings and eating out until the SSD has made It so difficult to hear/communicate in noisy environments. It definitely has impeded social relationships. My question is: are there others with SSD and looking back, did the CI work/help you? Was it worth the risk? What advice do you have for me as I start this process? Do you find success with the Sonnet 2 or Rondo 2? So Many questions...I appreciate your thoughts!...Thanks in advance for your advice/help!
  5. Hello everyone - We have just joined this group and thanks for having us. My 5-year old is a new implanted little girl with SSD. We are unsure when she went deaf in one ear. She was activated on 12/4. We are just beginning our AVT journey and long story short, we found out on this past Tuesday that she is hearing through her Roger Select and only loud noises through processor. She started out hearing beeps from activation (only through Roger) and continued over the month. I am a little frustrated with our Roger Select. She heard everything from her therapist from songs, words, sounds in a different room and one ear plugged. For our therapy at home, she only hears half of what I say through the Roger (which is great), but wondering why. Seems like a great device, but it is frustrating that I cannot see if it is working or hooked up to her okay unless she hears something. I only go in the next room about 10 feet away. It would be nice if the indicator stayed green while talking but everything goes off and Phonak said it is normal. She gets a little frustrated at home with AVT. I think part of it is I'm continuously asking her, "Do you hear anything?" because I fear it isn't working properly. While on this topic, does anyone have any great apps for a 5-year old that cannot read yet except for sight words? We have been streaming ABC Mouse music videos, etc. but this is getting old to her. Now that she is hearing, I'd like her to have something to interact better with, although she can interact with ABC, but we need something else. Thank you for your tips and advice! She is doing very well with wearing her processor, etc.
  6. Little_chooky

    Hello from Australia

    Hi all, I am from melbourne in Australia. I’m new here - I lost my hearing on my left side 2 months ago (profound loss) after an ear infection. I now have tinnitus as well. Ive been told it’s most likely permanent but have to wait a couple more months before I could look at implants. Would be keen to hear any tips on coping with single sided deafness / if you are considering CI or if you already have one and found it has helped. Cheers Caroline
  7. Hi, I recently became ssd in my left ear. I had some questions about cochlear implants. 1. How does a CI sound in one ear compare to normal hearing from the other, will they confuse eachother or will hearing become normal on both sides? 2. Will CI's prevent any future treatment from stem cells in pipeline. 3. Does it matter how much time passes from when i lost my hearing to getting the CO, as I am very much still trying to make a decision on this. 4. Would anyone in the same position share whether they thought it was worth it or better just living with one ear. Or perhaps a bone bridge would be a good solution? 5. Has anyone heard of the advancement in completely in ear CIs? I read an article on this but there seems to be nothing since 2014? Many Thanks
  8. Hello, Everyone, As a woman in her mid-60s, I have congenital sensorineural hearing loss in both ears, and wear hearing aids in both ears. I am basically deaf in the right ear, with have decent speech discrimination in the left. With my current set of hearing aids, I can hear/sense a little bit of sound from my deaf side but zilch discrimination, giving me some directional information as to where to turn. I've been told that a bi-cros hearing aid solution would give me better hearing, but no directional information at all. However, recently several audiologists have told me that I may be an excellent candidate for a CI in my right ear, which I never dreamed was a possibility. My question is: will the sound from a CI be so different/disparate from the sounds in my better ear such that it would make understanding speech and other sounds more difficult? In other words, will my brain adapt and will my overall discrimination be better with a CI? Thank you.
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