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Activation Day


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Marybeth

Actually for me, it was the voices of people I didn't know or know well. Friends and family sounded more "normal" luckily, things settled rather quickly

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Adam,

Isn't it amazing how things vary from CI user to CI user? Fortunately when there is a large group of us comparing notes, we are bound to find others with similar experiences. It sure does explain why the surgeons and audiologists are so cautious when explaining how we may function with CIs based on our pre-surgical testing and history. However sometimes our results even surprise the professionals. Thankfully my long standing "dead" right ear sure surpassed any expectations from my CI team. The power of our brain's neuroplasticity astounds me every day.

Working as a Teacher of the Deaf with students who have CIs, I can attest that intelligence or language competence does not necessarily help predict success with a CI after auditory training. I have worked with students without any language and with some cognitive limitations who have done amazingly well with their CIs. Of course we also read of adults with language and without cognitive limitations who struggle with their CIs. There is definitely more to learn about factors that predict CI success.

It's a fascinating field and an exciting time to be studying and learning about CIs. So much is being discovered each year. We are fortunate to be CI users now. I look forward to future advances in CI technology. I wonder what is in store for us all down the road.

Have a great week,

Mary Beth

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I totally agree and very well said. Sometimes I will stand in a crowded room and just take my processors off for a few seconds. Sit in silence, then put them back on. Just like that, the cocougheny of sound is back. It really makes me appreciate the gift I have been given as well as just feel in awe of the technology that gives us this gift

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Adam,

I went to church thinking "I won't hear the worship music," so I purposely went in late.

When I arrived the pastor was talking, and I couldn't hear a word he was saying. But to my surprise, when the worship leader started the music for a familiar hymn, I heard the beat - not all the words, but I picked up the beat! I started to sing and then I asked my husband if I was off key, and he said, "No." I was ecstatic! This was just with the CI!

I put my hearing aid in the other ear and I still had trouble hearing the message. I think I need to sit up closer to the stage next time. I also noted that Pastor was moving around a lot and talking faster than normal - he was very animated yesterday.

Elaine

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If I was in a room with a live band, I had a hard time in the beginning even though I knew the song. All I could really pick out were the drums.

It was much easier for me to understand somebody that was talking with no mic. For some reason, if the person was talking into a mic, I had a very hard time following along. Same went with anything on the radio. It was something about the electronic devices that I had a problem with. I had challenges in person as well but electronic, forget it. It all got WAAY better and now I am fine. Be patient

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Adam,

Isn't it amazing how things vary from CI user to CI user? Fortunately when there is a large group of us comparing notes, we are bound to find others with similar experiences. It sure does explain why the surgeons and audiologists are so cautious when explaining how we may function with CIs based on our pre-surgical testing and history. However sometimes our results even surprise the professionals. Thankfully my long standing "dead" right ear sure surpassed any expectations from my CI team. The power of our brain's neuroplasticity astounds me every day.

Working as a Teacher of the Deaf with students who have CIs, I can attest that intelligence or language competence does not necessarily help predict success with a CI after auditory training. I have worked with students without any language and with some cognitive limitations who have done amazingly well with their CIs. Of course we also read of adults with language and without cognitive limitations who struggle with their CIs. There is definitely more to learn about factors that predict CI success.

It's a fascinating field and an exciting time to be studying and learning about CIs. So much is being discovered each year. We are fortunate to be CI users now. I look forward to future advances in CI technology. I wonder what is in store for us all down the road.

Have a great week,

Mary Beth

 

Mary Beth,

 

I can undersign every single your word because at this topic I am at the other side and I know how lot of people in the business are still too conservative. There is a hard work behind this and belief this is going into right direction. I know that I was puzzled how people with CI function - that's why I have started to explore more and more through Adam's and Jim's words... I have found fascinated how professionals still know so little about results in the field of (re)habilitation. To me - this was a turbo kick to start participate in the CI conferences to gather as much of knowledge it is shared there. Last conference in the Munich was extremely interested, so if you can - I would warmly recommend you to attend the conference in Toronto. Lot's of extremely interesting speakers will be there. :)

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Ivana,

Does this mean you are attending the conference in Toronto? Fingers crossed.

Mary Beth

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Elaine, that is ver encouraging. I'm happy things went so well in church for you. I had trouble at my nephew's wedding this past summer, hearing the speeches when a microphone was used. Music, I can get the beat, but not the words. Practice will help.

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Ivana,

Does this mean you are attending the conference in Toronto? Fingers crossed.

Mary Beth

Still waiting for a decision of the scientific council... :(

As soon as I will know something, I'll let you know...;):)

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Glad to hear things are going well Elaine. Keep up the good work. This is where the hard work starts!!

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Hi everyone,

Now that you mentioned it, the Preacher at church was using a wireless microphone, which is another medium sound has to travel before it gets to my ear. He was also talking quickly and moving around. Should I sit closer to the front next time?

On another note, this is day 5 since Activation Day and I am doing well with my "listening training." At first, I couldn't hear the difference between a male voice and a female one. I am doing the Consonant Recognition, and finding that listening is hard work but not bad.

Elaine

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Don't over do it though. I have headaches from possibly over doing it. Only do what your brain can handle. It's a big adjustment so baby steps. It's a marathon not a sprint. That what these guys here keep telling me!! Lol glad to hear it's going well for you. Yes I would sit closer and use no extra listening devices. That is how I do it. I can't get all the sermon but it is much better than it used to be.

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Hi everyone,

Now that you mentioned it, the Preacher at church was using a wireless microphone, which is another medium sound has to travel before it gets to my ear. He was also talking quickly and moving around. Should I sit closer to the front next time?

On another note, this is day 5 since Activation Day and I am doing well with my "listening training." At first, I couldn't hear the difference between a male voice and a female one. I am doing the Consonant Recognition, and finding that listening is hard work but not bad.

Elaine

 

I would advise you to approach closer to your preacher because you're still not activated at final intensity which will be increased over time as you show tolerance to a certain level of intensity.

 

This is great - just don't kill yourself by practicing....

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It's definitely important to listen to your body when you are doing auditory training. Remember that you want to meet with success over and over again. There is no benefit in listening to something that is too difficult at the moment. Success breeds success. Once you find yourself getting tired or making many mistakes, it is time to stop. There is also nothing wrong with returning to easier levels for more practice time. You may find that even though you mastered the skill before, now the voice has a better tone quality.

Try to have fun with training. It will be an important part of your journey.

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Elaine, I agree with Mary Beth. When I was first activated, I found all the sounds and concentrating tiring. It takes time and you need to pace yourself.

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