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EAS Experience: Sound Quality & Learning Curve

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Hi All, 

I was told yesterday that I qualify for an EAS device.  I have high frequency hearing loss with normal low frequency hearing.  I have been looking online and am concerned about the "electronic" sound of the cochlear implant.  I'm also worried about how long it takes to get back to "normal."  I.e. would I be able to return to work quickly?    I can hear OK.  1:1 I'm fine & lip reading helps a lot.  I'm concerned that if I get the implant I'll be unhappy with the quality of sound / not be able to listen to music etc.  I'd love to hear from other who have gone through this experience, whether it's on this forum, private messages, or by phone. 

 

Thanks. 

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Hi and welcome to Hearpeers!  I have a concerto implant. Yes there was sounds that were mechanical. The mechanical sounds disappeared. Now I don't have the EAS but from the point of view of an imp,ant it is the best thing I have ever done. Hearing again is so amazing and all the things I can hear again blow me away. I can talk on the phone I can listen to music again and the outside sounds!! It's a natural concert!! Recovery is different for each person and depeands on the surgeon as well. So listen to your team. Best of luck on your journey!! Talk soon, Kara 

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Hello and welcome,

 

I have been implanted in my right ear for 1 year 8 months and implanted in my left ear for 1 year.  Although things started off sounding very different, for a long time now things have sounded very natural.  In fact, music is so amazing.  I returned to work in less than 1 week and functioned fine while my auditory skills were improving.  It may depend on your job.  Best of luck to you.  It's an amazing journey.

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Hi,

It depends on - neuroplasticity. More you exercise, things will sound more natural. The aural rehabilitation is one of key element to succeed in your strive.

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Gotta love neuroplasticity and aural rehab!  Smile.

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It is the best medicine. Like a spoon full of sugar!! 

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Thank you both so much!  I really appreciate it. 

 

Any chance you could tell me where you got implanted and with what electrode?

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I was implanted at New York Eye and Ear Cochlear Implant Center in NYC.  The electrode arrays were chosen by my surgeons to best fit my cochleas.

My right CI is an internal Concert implant with a medium 24 electrode array.

My left CI is an internal Synchrony implant (it had been FDA approved by then) with a flex 28 electrode array.

I did not have low frequency hearing worth attempting to save.  

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I was implanted at Virginia Mason in Seattle. My both electrode arrays are the flex 28.

I was able to use my new implanted CI independently to communicate at work in 10 days after activation. But it was the ear that had some residual hearing before surgery. And it takes much  more time for my another ear to be reliable in the different communication settings. But that my ear didn't process any sounds for about 10 years. Never regret my decision to go with CI. Now need to read more about EAS, as yesterday, after my first testing (1 month post-activation) I was told that the amount of my residual hearing I have left after surgery makes me a possible candidate for EAS.

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Cara,

It's great that you have enough residual hearing to use a Sonnet EAS.  First side, second side or both?  Is there a way you can trade in a Sonnet for a Sonnet EAS or do you have to go through your insurance for the EAS?

Keep us posted.  In my opinion, you only gain when you add in the acoustic component.  

 

Mary Beth

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Mary Beth,

 

I agree that with EAS I will gain more. Only one thing make me uncertain - it is so good not to have anything inside my ear canal.

I have residual hearing only on my second side as I had completely nothing left on my first side a way before the surgery :)

I am not sure how that works to get that EAS. My audi just told me to think about it so we can discuss it during my next appointment in February. She told that if I am OK to go with EAS she will start exploring the ways to get it. I am just surprise to get into this topic as before my second surgery my CI team though that I have very tiny hearing left to think about EAS. Going to find about eligibility criteria for EAS.

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Hi I'm implanted with concerto and with a flex 28mm electrode. 

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Cara,

 

I'm not sure if this is an option, but in case it is.....

I read reports of CI users wearing a Rondo and a HA on the same side to get the benefit from the acoustic and electrical input simultaneously.  If you have a Rondo and a HA and your audiologist is willing to do this......she could set your HA for low frequency acoustic Input only and set a MAP on your Rondo for the rest of the range.  Then you may be able to experience what hybrid input would sound like.  

 

Renee Gifford also published articles about fitting CI users with ITE HA on the same side and setting the HA for bass sounds and CI for the rest.  

 

I definitely understand not wanting to deal with an earmold again.  It would have to be worth the hassle.  Maybe this would give you a way to test it out a bit.  Just a thought.

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Mary Beth, that's the brilliant idea. Unfortunately I have no Rondo and my Ci center has no tools to program my HA. But I will try (kind of just for fun and some perception) to hung both my BTEs (Sonnet and HA) to see if it makes any difference. I have a week or so before my HA is going to a new home :) Thank you for your idea.

Will find Renee Gifford's articles. Thank you for that hint, too.

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Cara,

 

When they set hybrid/EAS systems, they do not send the same sounds through both.  Acoustic for low frequency and electric for the rest so it will sound different than listening through a HA set for before the CI and a CI set for the entire range.

 

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Mary Beth,

 

Thank you. I understood your explanation about how EAS works. Just have no chance to try is as it should be - no Rondo, not possible to reprogram my HA... So, I just tried to figure out how acoustic and electric stimulation feels. Honestly, didn't get much :)

Already said "bye" to my HA. Believe or not, even didn't feel a bit of sadness when donated it. I know, that was unfair of me but... B)

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I happily donated my HAs too.  Good riddance.

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I wish!! Mine will be too ld by the time I get there!! Already five years old. 

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Kara, you know that time will come sooner than we think. Everything comes on time for whose who knows how to wait the right way :)

 

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I know! Thanks for vote of confidence. I can't wait and it will come at just the right time I'm sure!! 

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Great idea...:)

Hope is the best drug ever!

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Quite true Ivana!! ?❤️

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So Cara - have you had opportunity to play a little bit with your hearing toys? ;):P

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I had. But honestly, I didn't notice any difference. You know, it is was improperly designed experiment. Most challenging part, of course, was to have both CI and HA hung on the same poor ear :)

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I have the Sonata implant in both ears. Each ear activation things sounded a little different.

activation of my left ear, people sounded like cartoon characters

activation on my right, things sounded more synthesized and robotic.

luckily, after the activations things settled down pretty quickly and sounded normal. I have had my implants for a little over 5 years

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