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The way music helps...


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  • HearPeers Heroes

Hmmm I actually enjoy music very much with my CI. That started at about the 4 month point post activation. I'm not sure I would enjoy simpler music as described in this article. I have been listening the the Grammy 2016 nomination CD and all of that music is brand new to me. I am learning the lyrics and singing along all by just listening. I have not looked up the lyrics or watched any videos of the songs. It's so much fun to enjoy music again. I find myself singing all the time- off key for sure but singing again. Smile.

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  • HearPeers Heroes

I am starting music training. ( as I call it.) I notice my CI is hearing some notes off key. So I have to work harder in that area I have some classical music to start listening to and well as regular stuff. It's a matter of time. That's all. The three P's.

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  • HearPeers Heroes

Great Kara. I'm starting my training in music too. A friend and I are driving to Phoenix next week and she said we will be listening to CDs the whole way. Good luck to you. We can compare our experiences!

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  • HearPeers Heroes

I really enjoy music now as well. As I have said in the past, for me, music and the phone took the longest to come back but it was well worth it. I had to be very patient

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  • HearPeers Heroes

Listening to music that I knew from a long time ago helped quite a bit. Much easier for me to understand than some of the newer music. Now it doesn't matter. I just stated in another post that music and the phone took the longest for me to come back. Got very frustrated at times but eventually it all worked out.

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  • HearPeers Heroes

There are actually a number of articles out there and some video on music appreciation and CIs. Just have to dig a little bit. I think this will be an ongoing learning process for the companies and recipients as technology improves.

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  • HearPeers Heroes

Ok Sandy. I will do that. That's kind of what I have started with. Now I have gotten music that I was familiar with but never was able to learn all the words so I googled the lyrics and took a picture of them to store it in my iPad and I follow along with it that way.

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  • HearPeers Heroes

This is now next big issue, Adam - at next CI conference in Toronto special attention will be provided toward the music appreciation.

Also, ARO meeting this year also had special appearance of Prof. Charles Limb who has devoted his professional interest to the research of the music appreciation of CI's.

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  • HearPeers Heroes

Regarding the fact how actually understand present music - it has to be hard, because although today music is not so memorable as it used to be, but songs are very different by style, rhythm and else.

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  • HearPeers Heroes

For sure Sandy!! Does anybody have any advice??

I don't think I can give any advice here. But I can share what I started to do.

I found the way to use a real piano to listen to single specific notes till I hear it naturally (the hospital in our town has a piano in the lobby with not so much people around).

 

Then, I am started with my favorite music I know well. And it is complicated music - classic orchestra (Mozart, Bach, Pergolesi),  rock (Pink Floyd, Black Sabbath, Queen), and modern classic (Enigma, Phantom of the opera by A.L. Webber).

I got from the article posted at the beginning of this topic that simple music brings more enjoyment according to the research. But I am not sure if we can extrapolate this finding to an efficient way of rehabilitation (perhaps that's true for some part of rehab <like specific sound discrimination training> or when combined with the different techniques).

But I do believe that stimulating a multimodal brain activity during training brings a very good benefits. 

 

When I get melody well and can hear high frequency moments, I turn the volume down and listen all over till I am ready to go down again. And I printed out the lyrics to follow. So far I have not much success here but I am not in a hurry. And it is a big enjoyment to be back - I stopped listening to music several months ago. Seems like not a big deal, but I missed it. And now I hear it closer to what it is than what I heard when I decided that it is time to stop  as I heard just low frequency tam-tams.

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  • HearPeers Heroes

Cara,

I missed music immensely! I had stopped playing the piano and even donated it years ago. The gift of music that my CIs have returned to me is priceless. For me, music started sounding better at about three months for my right CI. It began with noticing percussion and then added layers one by one. My left CI has loved music much sooner. Now I am learning new songs just by repeated listening- no more searching for lyrics. I find myself singing along and sings hang out in my mind all day. It is so much fun.

Now pitch perception is still evolving. I have an electronic keyboard (I really miss my piano now!) and play scales to help with pitch perception. It's still a work in progress but so much better now that I'm bilateral.

Have fun playing notes. Making music part of your auditory training is a wise move.

Mary Beth

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  • HearPeers Heroes

I think one thine my CIs have done is given me the chance to listen to music again for sure.

It almost sounds even better now as I now do not take anything for granted. Music seems so much more rich and full and even more enjoyable.

Kind of like that saying, " you don't truly appreciate what you have, until you do not have it anymore".

Very fitting for hearing loss.

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  • HearPeers Heroes

I don't think I can give any advice here. But I can share what I started to do.

I found the way to use a real piano to listen to single specific notes till I hear it naturally (the hospital in our town has a piano in the lobby with not so much people around).

 

Then, I am started with my favorite music I know well. And it is complicated music - classic orchestra (Mozart, Bach, Pergolesi),  rock (Pink Floyd, Black Sabbath, Queen), and modern classic (Enigma, Phantom of the opera by A.L. Webber).

I got from the article posted at the beginning of this topic that simple music brings more enjoyment according to the research. But I am not sure if we can extrapolate this finding to an efficient way of rehabilitation (perhaps that's true for some part of rehab <like specific sound discrimination training> or when combined with the different techniques).

But I do believe that stimulating a multimodal brain activity during training brings a very good benefits. 

 

When I get melody well and can hear high frequency moments, I turn the volume down and listen all over till I am ready to go down again. And I printed out the lyrics to follow. So far I have not much success here but I am not in a hurry. And it is a big enjoyment to be back - I stopped listening to music several months ago. Seems like not a big deal, but I missed it. And now I hear it closer to what it is than what I heard when I decided that it is time to stop  as I heard just low frequency tam-tams.

 

 

I added this article to discuss this matter - I wanted to hear opinions of CI implantees in order to see at which level these researchers found these study participants.

It is very important to write about this particular matter.

I have seen some rehabilitation methods and mainly percussion methods were included like - drumming; also, at the Cochlea CI festival I could see that most participants chose pianos. 

This "Photoshop" idea with exercising essential melodies and than adding layers sound as extremely valuable idea. :)

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  • HearPeers Heroes

Cara,

I missed music immensely! I had stopped playing the piano and even donated it years ago. The gift of music that my CIs have returned to me is priceless. For me, music started sounding better at about three months for my right CI. It began with noticing percussion and then added layers one by one. My left CI has loved music much sooner. Now I am learning new songs just by repeated listening- no more searching for lyrics. I find myself singing along and sings hang out in my mind all day. It is so much fun.

Now pitch perception is still evolving. I have an electronic keyboard (I really miss my piano now!) and play scales to help with pitch perception. It's still a work in progress but so much better now that I'm bilateral.

Have fun playing notes. Making music part of your auditory training is a wise move.

Mary Beth

 

Excellent idea Mary Beth - the "photoshop" theory of everything! ;):D

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