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Facebook España - ¡Síguenos :-)!


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Hola Hearpeers Hispanoparlantes,

Desde poco, MED-EL España abrió sus puertas a las redes sociales con la página Facebook como nueva vía de comunicación de la compañía.

Su principal objetivo es poder proporcionar información sobre  nuestra empresa, nuestros productos, nuestro equipo global, la pérdida auditiva y eventos de interés general, así como fomentar la interacción con nuestros usuarios.

¡Esperamos que os guste y nos ayudéis a difundirla!

Podéis visitarla desde el siguiente enlace:

https://www.facebook.com/medel.espanya

Un abrazo a todos,

Lisa

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Lisa,

 

please write in English, I cant understand anything Frown

 

This is a world-wide community, so it's better to use the English language.

 

Thomas

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Hi again,

 

Sorry, I wrote in Spanish to let all Spanishspeakers in the Community (there are 2 groups and quite a lot of Spanishspeaking members) know there is someone from MED-EL speaking Spanish too :-). I also wanted to inform those Spanishspeakers about the new Spanish Facebook Page :-). Sorry for creating confusion!

 

Have a nice day, Lisa

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Lisa, welcome to HearPeers!  Maybe you could teach us all Spanish?  I speak semi-fluent TexMex, Adam, whom you will meet speaks fluent New Yorkese and some Southren (no, that is not a typo) and our Canadian group English with possibly some French!

 

glad you joined

 

John

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Lisa,

As John pointed out I am from New York originally but have moved down south in the State of South Carolina. I still have some northern accent and have picked up a few words more southern. which is totally different from NY.

 

Looking forward to getting to know you.

 

Adam

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I can offer lessons from Croatian which is rather narrow-used language but is understandable to quite decent number of people (20+ millions). Laughing

Just kidding (as always Innocent) - wanted to show that we all have - a horse for a race. Wink

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Haha,

 

I can offer a very special type of German (Tyrolian dialect mixed with some Jodeling in between :-P), English (with a rather British accent), and Spanish (with an accent depending on where I currently am :-)). So choose!

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Sorry, forgot to answer that before ... My main responsibility is communication in our Spanish-speaking Social Media Channels.

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Gnädige Lisa, you have joined a forum of polyglots. woohoo  I can also speak French.  Now we need to start posting in our languages.

¡Hola! ¿que tal?

Bonjour, comment ça va?

 

Adam and Miriam, you're up next

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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English

very little Spanish (use it or lose it) I didnt use it

very little french. (mainly due to my culinary education. classically trained so pretty much all terms were in french)

American sign Language

very little Korean.

 

Korean very basic. at this point could probably only introduce myself and order in a restaurant.

ASL, can carry on a conversation. If I get stuck, usually fall back on finger spelling.

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Hallå på svenska, hur mår ni idag? Det var längesen jag använde mitt svenska key board.

How about that? lol

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BTW, I have noticed that my daughter (with CI's) seams to have a harder time picking up another language than my son with normal hearing does. Input from you with CI's, do you think it's typical because of her hearing loss??

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It might have to do with the flexion in the voice. i'm sure pitch and tone is a little different which might throw er off. Not sure how long she has had the CI but even after having it, it takes a while to not have to rely on lip reading. foreign languages form words and mouth movements differently. she would not be able to use lip reading to fill in the blanks. I'm not an audi, this is just a guess on my part

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Yes true... Linnea never had "normal" hearing either, maybe that also have some to do with it. She got her CI #1 when she was only 19 mos old.

 

This is why I love to hear from you guys that used to hear and then got CI's; Jana being one. :) The experience is so different, and also how you can compare this hearing from your past normal hearing. I never get tired of reading about it. My daughter gets quite annoyed at me when I ask how she hears things, she always tells me "how can I explain to you - I have nothing else to compare with!!". Ha ha

 

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understandable??? speak for yourself.  Undecided

 

 

??? Surprised

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BTW, I have noticed that my daughter (with CI's) seams to have a harder time picking up another language than my son with normal hearing does. Input from you with CI's, do you think it's typical because of her hearing loss??

 

I have started to understand foreign languages when I have eliminated thoughts in my language. Now when I am writing to you I am not thinking at all in Croatian than directly think&write in English. Of course, I am not fluent - I am missing larger vocabulary but I am satisfied and I have accomplished this, little bit more advance level by reading intensively all what I could and - it just came in.

 

I have never lip-read so facial mimics is not important to me, anagrams are which have been stored in my hearing part of cortex.

Sometimes when I do not use for a while a foreign language  need some time to plug myself "into flow".

 

So, I think "in this bush lies rabbit" - creating anagrams...

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So it's my turn: Dragi kolege, sudionici ove zajednice: Što se radi? Wink

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Ivana can you at least translate for us poor people who have NO CLUE what your saying?    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS0YjddPRM1khPxsaHMgQr

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Not fair! now i am gonna have to use google translate to figure out what you guys are saying.

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Miriam, it is interesting that your daughter gets annoyed when you ask her how she hears things. On the other side of the coin, I get frustrated when I ask someone what does, for example, running water sound like and the answer comes out "I don't know, what do you mean." I think for your daughter, because she was implanted very early, however things sound that is how she identifies the sound and it is normal for her?? Don't know if that makes sense.

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