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suzanacooper
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Hello everyone,

 

I am getting a Med-El cochlear implant in about a month in my right ear.  I would like to know what sort of things to expect from the surgery and after.  I lost most hearing capacity in my right ear a few years ago due to Meniere's disease.  Two months ago I suddenly lost all hearing in my left ear due to a Schwannoma tumor.  I have decided to get a Cochlear Implant so that I can get some form of hearing back.  

 

I do not understand how one acquires "hearing" through the CI.  I know it's like learning another language, but I'm not sure what that means.  Apparently it's like learning an African language with a lot of clicks, clacks, and other sounds?  Any information would be greatly appreciated.

 

thank you so very much!

Suzana Cooper

 

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Hi Suzana and welcome,

Your comment about clicks and clacks made me laugh. At first when I was activated (turned on) I only heard static and beeps however within that first week speech emerged. Now I am listening to speech all of the time- no more static and beeps.

You can do independent auditory training on your iPad. There are several helpful apps. I started with ABClix and then moved to AngelSounds.

Good luck with your surgery. I hope your time with the beeps and clicks is short.

Mary Beth

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Welcome to hearpeers

You can talk to 10 different people and they will all give you different experiences when it comes to activation I have 2 CIs and both my activations were different. The first, most people sounded like cartoon characters, Alvin the chipmunk, Darth Vader, mini mouse.... Some sounded like static or white noise on the TV. My friends and family sounded the most "normal"

The second activation, everything sounded synthesized and robotic. For me the longest to come back was the ability to talk on the phone and listening to music. There are a number of listening exercises you can find on Medels website, plus many more on the Internet. You can also get books(preferably children's books) on tape. You can listen while reading aloud. Children's books are good as you are familiar with them.

Just remember the 3 P's, PRACTICE, PATIENCE and PERSEVERANCE.

Feel free to ask as many questions as you would like. This is a great community of people in various stages of their hearing journey

Adam

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Hello everyone,

 

I am getting a Med-El cochlear implant in about a month in my right ear.  I would like to know what sort of things to expect from the surgery and after.  I lost most hearing capacity in my right ear a few years ago due to Meniere's disease.  Two months ago I suddenly lost all hearing in my left ear due to a Schwannoma tumor.  I have decided to get a Cochlear Implant so that I can get some form of hearing back.  

 

I do not understand how one acquires "hearing" through the CI.  I know it's like learning another language, but I'm not sure what that means.  Apparently it's like learning an African language with a lot of clicks, clacks, and other sounds?  Any information would be greatly appreciated.

 

thank you so very much!

Suzana Cooper

Hello Suzana and welcome to the Hearpeers,

Your CI will be implanted in your cochlea, the right one - I assume that due to the schwannoma you lost your left inner ear. So by electrical stimulation of cochlear nerve impulses of outer signals are transduced to the neural path and further to the cortical auditory center. Basically, each process of hearing works like this. By electrode, your cochlea is bypassed in a way that your non-functioned hearing cells are bypassed and directly connected with your hearing nerve which is fine. 

 

This is usual way of hearing: outer ear (auricle), middle ear (ossicles), inner ear with outer and inner hair cells which die, hearing nerve, brainstem, cortical auditory center.

By CI and electrode particularly, system is bypassed all through the auditory nerve. The process of adapting and evolving neuroplastic potential is what you describe as clicks, chipmunks or etc. :)

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  • 5 months later...

Hi Folks,

 

I am new to all of this except for the fact that I also have Meniere's disease, but in both ears.  My main concern coming into this was whether or not an implant would be of any benefit for me with the loss of the sensing hairs in the inner ear.  I am going to get the implant in the left ear first and if things work out hopefully I'll be able to get the right ear taken care of also. 

 

The comments in the earlier posts make sense to me and I feel much more comfortable about completing this adventure.  I realize that it will take considerable effort and patience to learn to totally benefit from the implant and I'm ready for that.  I'll be 82 in June so I hope to get some benefit as quickly as possible.

 

Hal

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Hi Hal and welcome!

It's exciting that you are going to get a CI. The journey is amazing! Feel free to ask any questions you have. We are a helpful group of friendly people who have been there.

Mary Beth

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Welcome to Hearpeers Hal!! Good luck and keep us posted!!! We would love to hear more from you.

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Hi Hal

I think you will be pleasantly surprised with the results

Please stick around, and feel free to ask questions and share as much or as little about yourself that you would like

Adam

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Hi Hal - wishing you a pleasant welcome as my colleagues.

Regarding your question - there is no easy answer, I do not know what is your current hearing threshold but we have already been reading here some tremendously interesting results. It's OK to have a fear in front of the serious challenge but giving all what you are willing to invest has to give a reward. ;)

:)

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  • 2 weeks later...

The surgery went fine for me.  I was sore for awhile afterward, but that's to be expected.  When Activation Day come, then that will be your first day hearing.  From what I experience (and what I think most if not everyone experience), everything sounds robotic.  The more you practice, the less robotic things become.  You should definitely make it a priority to practice every day.  I can tell you I never regret getting the implant done.  I was implanted in my right ear.  I was born deaf in my right ear, so I have never heard out of it until I got the implant and Activation Day came. :-)  Now, I am awaiting word from my doctor's office as to whether or not the insurance company approves of the implant in my left ear (which I have about 10% or less hearing in that ear).  Don't expect to hear completely and clearly right from the start.  It's a journey well worth it!

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