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Implanted 3 days ago, waiting for Activation


Tony
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Hi Everyone, I've been lurking here for a few months and had been meaning to introduce myself before getting implanted, but never found the time to do it. Now in recovery mode and have plenty of time so figured I'd give it a go.

 

I'm 35 and was born with a degenerative sensorineural hearing loss that has progressed to the point that I have severe loss from 125hz-500hz and profoundly deaf above 500hz in both ears. My left ear is slightly better than my right, so I decided to have the right implanted. The slow progressive loss has allowed me to adapt well and I have communicated verbally throughout my life (years of speech therapy and speech reading has helped). However, the past couple of years have gotten extremely difficult in any situation to communicate. Music stopped being enjoyable for me about 4 years ago and hearing aids stopped being much of a help 15 years ago.

I have never let my hearing loss get the better of me, even though it has made life tough at times. I own a successful business, am married, and have a beautiful 22 month old daughter. Both my wife and daughter have normal hearing, and despite how supportive and patient my wife is with my hearing loss (I am quite lucky), it has been frustrating for her to communicate with me the past 2 years as my hearing loss accelerated. Last year I realized that I had reached the point where it was limiting my life and it was time to look into a cochlear implant. I didn't really have a clue where to start until a mutual friend recommended us to Stanford Ear Institute. I had my initial appointment in April, where they determined I was an excellent CI candidate. We set a surgery date for July, emailed back and forth and took care of the vaccinations and CT scan, and here I am 3 months later with a cochlear implant.

 

I initially was going to go with AB, but the more I researched, the more Med El seemed to be the most mature technology. The Rondo was very appealing to me, The MRI compatibility is a big deal, as most of us will need an MRI in our life. Also, at Stanford they said they have rarely had any issues with Med El implants or processors breaking. Med El's marketing material was much more appealing to me as it contained facts and hard data to backup their claims of being the best, while Cochlear and AB were way too much fluff copywriting and single experience stories. My decision was sealed when I saw results of an independent study with Med El users giving the highest satisfaction marks for their CI's in natural sound and music appreciation. (can't remember the name, but it's referenced in their marketing material).

 

I was implanted at Stanford Medical Center on July 14th. The surgeon was very experienced with Med El implants. I received the longest electrode (Flex 28) fully inserted without issue. My surgeon described the surgery as a textbook success. Also, I still seem to have kept a good amount of residual hearing in the implanted ear, so hopefully it stays..

Following the surgery I have the standard ringing, dizziness and balance issues, but not too much pain. For comparison, this is much better feeling than a sinus infection or a hangover. I didn't get very nauseous from the anesthesia and was eating pizza a couple hours later without a problem.

For the processors I am getting both the Sonnet and Rondo. I always found behind the ear hearing aids very uncomfortable so I plan to use the Rondo more as well as the waterwear. But we'll see what works best. Does anyone here have both and prefer one or the other?

 

I am really looking forward to hearing my daughter better and communicating with her as well as with my wife and others, and meeting new people. Also hope to enjoy my favorite music again.

 

Cheers!

 

Tony

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Welcome Tony! And thanks for taking the time to introduce yourself to us. I wish you the best in your hearing journey.

Check out the FaceBook group

Med El Cochlear Implant Discussion Group

also and join in there as well. Both groups are friendly and supportive and each group has something different to offer.

I do have both the Sonnet and Rondo processors. I like them both. I use the Sonnet as my daily processor and use the Rondo for water activities as well as when I will be sweating a lot. The Sonnet has the newest platform and has features that we are waiting for FDA approval to be activated (like dual mics and windblock settings) and also features that we are waiting for Med-El to release here (like rechargeable batteries and waterwear covers) and also features that are still in development (like wireless 2.4 connectivity). The Rondo is based on the previous platform (same as the Opus2) and does not have these features. Even without all of the Sonnet features activated in the US yet, it still sounds and behaves differently than the Rondo/Opus2 to me. It has a more natural sound quality. But I love my Rondos and even took them into the ocean riding waves a few months ago. It was awesome! The Sonnet waterwear covers are expected to be available in the US near the end of summer. I don't plan on using them because I love the Rondo waterwear covers. Nothing on my ears when in the pool, so comfortable you don't even know you have the waterwear cover on, everything sounds great and I have a system in place to secure them safely without worry.

If you do decide to use your Rondo in waterwear covers, the alkaline LR44 batteries only lasted 4-6 hours for me but the energizer silver oxide 357 batteries lasted 12 hours. Just FYI. We can not use zinc air batteries in waterwear covers since the covers are air tight.

I hope your healing goes quickly and I wish you the best at activation. It's a fabulous journey. I am a big fan of aural rehab (training our brains to understand the sound from the CI). If you join the FaceBook group you can find a file I uploaded on aural rehab for adults by ..

Look in logo box, click on more

Click on group info

Files

It's there.

On HearPeers Cara recently posted several posts containing great info on aural rehab too.

Welcome!

Mary Beth

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Wow! Great story! Hi and welcome to Hearpeers! I have a similar history and was implanted nine months ago!! It's the best thing I have ever done!! My hearing is phenomenal and can hear music again. As well as use the phone. I have a Sonnet only but om loving it! The technology is also phenomenal! I love the dual mics and the waterwear for Sonnet! It's a huge step up from HAs. So rest up the best is yet to come!!

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Hello Tony :)

 

Not a CI implantee - but stopped by to say hello & good luck! - Keep up with your good work... ;)

I would underline the necessity of aural rehabilitation to develop your best results: practice, be patient - persevere. :)

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Thanks Mary Beth, Kara and Ivana! I have read a few of each of your posts while in lurking mode, so it's nice to finally interact with you. I joined the Facebook group too, and I definitely plan on checking out those documents soon.

 

My activation is scheduled for July 27th, Only 13 days after surgery! I Then have a followup appointment a week after that. I am hopeful things will progress quickly, especially since it seems my residual hearing was mostly preserved. I've read that studies point to this being very beneficial in enjoying music.

 

Mary Beth, I was especially encouraged by the results you have had with your implants, what an amazing success they have been for you! Yes, I am looking forward to rondo with the waterwear. I also might like to try it with the Sonnet though, and now that sonnet has rechargeable batteries, I may be using that most of the time. They better have ordered the rechargeable batteries for me!

 

Kara, if I'm not mistaken you have only had your implants for a few months now and you seem to be having great success as well! Thanks for the aural rehab guides. I will certainly check them out.

 

Ivana, I did not realize you did not have a CI. So you have a middle ear implant? Also, I think I saw that you are a doctor as well? And Croatia looks very beautiful in Rick Steves episodes, lucky you. All Mediterranean countries are beautiful to me.

 

I was wondering how other people's recoveries went and if they are having a similar issue that I am. My dizziness and balance issues are a lot better. Pain around the incision and under the skin around the implant is pretty much gone too but I still have a pretty deep pain in my middle ear along with feeling of being completely plugged up. If I don't take painkillers, the pain is very uncomfortable. I have a long history of sinus issues and my ears always get very plugged up with a cold and I have to take decongestants at the first sign or I get a sinus infection. So I'm a bit concerned here especially with antibiotics wearing off soon. I'm thinking it's time to take a proactive approach. I was not prescribed prednisone for after the surgery, but I have read that some people are prescribed that, maybe that would help. I has helped me in the past with inflammation. Does anyone have a similar experience?

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Hi Tony,

The Sonnet rechargeable batteries are not out yet in E US but have been FDA approved. You will receive them when they are available. It comes with your Sonnet package. In the meantime, you will use disposable batteries. They also come in the Sonnet kit.

My recoveries were very easy- much easier than previous ear surgeries. I have read of others who feel "plugged up". You may want to let your surgeon know and see what your surgeon suggests.

Activations vary greatly and are no indication of future CI success so try to just go with the flow. Every ear is different- even two CI journeys for the same person.

I look forward to reading about your activation and CI journey. It always fascinates me. Best of luck.

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Hi Tony, welcome. My activation was July 14th. I have that plugged feeling too. I feel like I have a HA in my ear. I also had ear aches that are now gone. I got stabbing pains but they lasted only for a minute or so. Other than a little pain at the incision site, and I do mean little, I had no problems. I was a little dizzy and used a cane when I went out after my surgery but that only lasted a week or two.

I have a sonnet and am having some irritation behind my ear I think may be partly because of my glasses. I'm considering putting a sterri strip over it.

Since activation the tinnitus I had is gone while I'm wearing my processor. I have a lot of ringing that accompanies most sounds and it sure doesn't help understanding speech. Right now music isn't coming through, but it's only been a week. Do check out the rehab sites Mary Beth has suggested. I am working with one of them and hope to improve! Good luck with your journey. :-)

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Hi Tony yes my journey is amazing!! It was rocky in the beginning with the pain and complications from surgery. I can now listen to music and hear on the phone. Before my CI I couldn't do those things for about five years!! Best of luck with activation!!

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Thanks Kay, Mary Beth, and Kara!

 

I am happy to report that the pain subsided about 4 days ago, and I haven't had to have any painkillers since then. My tinnitus is back to normal (I have always had some tinnitus can tune it out) The feeling of being plugged up is still very strong. It seems much of the residual hearing that I thought I had is gone, but it's possible it may come back when my ear eventually drains all this fluid. Another problem is that I got a cold, and am now coughing, sneezing and having to blow my nose, which of course has the nurse practitioner scolding me.. but what am I supposed to do? lol.I was told that the main concern with blowing nose and popping ears and other types of pressure in your ears is the risk of getting bacteria in it. They did not mention anything about dislodging the placement of the electrode, and that is the only thing that worries me (oh well sure getting an infection and dying isn't good either) They put me on another round of antibiotics just to be safe. Not my favorite thing, but better safe than sorry.

 

Activation is Wednesday unless they decide to wait, due to the cold. I really hope not, as it's a 5 hour drive to Stanford. I was told that pain and feeling plugged up do not keep them from activating. Hopefully it gets activated!

 

Can anyone let me know how activation was for them? I am really scared that when it gets turned on all I will hear are pops, and hisses and no real discernible sound. Kara and Mary Beth, your stories continue to encourage me! I am scared, but hoping for the best!

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Use saline nasal spray it will help it drain. They are also worried as they don't want you to cases any CS fluid leaks. So don't blow your nose!!

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Best of luck tomorrow!!!! Activation day!!!

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Tony,

I hope your cold gets better soon.

I went into activation with 2 hopes:

1). I would hear each of the electrode beeps when my audiologist was setting the levels

2). The beeps would not all sound the same.

Both of my hopes happened and I was thrilled.

I knew if I was hearing the beeps, no matter what speech sounded like at first, I had a chance with aural rehab.

Just remember, whatever things sound like at activation that is just your starting point. Think of it as climbing a mountain. You have no idea of how beautiful the view is until you put in the work to summit.

Best of luck to you!

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Tony,

First I heard the beeps. Then a test like the one you get to determine at what level your hearing is so the volume can be set. Then we talked about the products he was giving me. I have that chime going on and sometimes it is really annoying, other times I can ignore it. He tried to get rid of it but it was happening on all settings so that couldn't happen. Try not to be anxious about your activation, I have a hunch it will be fine. Probably won't be excellent but it will get better.

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Hi Tony,  I am glad your surgery went well with a minor discomfort. Wish you to get some WoW moments tomorrow during (and, of course, a way after) your activation.

I also had some concern about not sneezing after my surgery. My surgeon reassured me that this is not a bog deal as it is only about a possibility to get some infection and nothing about an electrode dislocation which I worried about.

 

Right after my activation I could heard something - hard to explain as it was not real environmental sounds or voices. But it was sounds I could not hear for years! But in several hours things had started changing.... it was exciting. In several days I could hear a lot of sounds pretty natural (except running water). But it took more time to understand speech using only my implanted ear without help of my other highly impaired ear. But still I was much easier for me to communicate at work and home. The big changes in my speech and music understanding came to me around my 3 month mark. Currently, I am trying to get comfortable with a phone. I can do it, but still feel uncomfortable doing this. To be honest, it is more psychological issue than ability of my implanted ear :)

It would be great to hear about your experience tomorrow. I wish you the best!

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Hi Everyone, I've been lurking here for a few months and had been meaning to introduce myself before getting implanted, but never found the time to do it. Now in recovery mode and have plenty of time so figured I'd give it a go.

 

I'm 35 and was born with a degenerative sensorineural hearing loss that has progressed to the point that I have severe loss from 125hz-500hz and profoundly deaf above 500hz in both ears. My left ear is slightly better than my right, so I decided to have the right implanted. The slow progressive loss has allowed me to adapt well and I have communicated verbally throughout my life (years of speech therapy and speech reading has helped). However, the past couple of years have gotten extremely difficult in any situation to communicate. Music stopped being enjoyable for me about 4 years ago and hearing aids stopped being much of a help 15 years ago.

I have never let my hearing loss get the better of me, even though it has made life tough at times. I own a successful business, am married, and have a beautiful 22 month old daughter. Both my wife and daughter have normal hearing, and despite how supportive and patient my wife is with my hearing loss (I am quite lucky), it has been frustrating for her to communicate with me the past 2 years as my hearing loss accelerated. Last year I realized that I had reached the point where it was limiting my life and it was time to look into a cochlear implant. I didn't really have a clue where to start until a mutual friend recommended us to Stanford Ear Institute. I had my initial appointment in April, where they determined I was an excellent CI candidate. We set a surgery date for July, emailed back and forth and took care of the vaccinations and CT scan, and here I am 3 months later with a cochlear implant.

 

I initially was going to go with AB, but the more I researched, the more Med El seemed to be the most mature technology. The Rondo was very appealing to me, The MRI compatibility is a big deal, as most of us will need an MRI in our life. Also, at Stanford they said they have rarely had any issues with Med El implants or processors breaking. Med El's marketing material was much more appealing to me as it contained facts and hard data to backup their claims of being the best, while Cochlear and AB were way too much fluff copywriting and single experience stories. My decision was sealed when I saw results of an independent study with Med El users giving the highest satisfaction marks for their CI's in natural sound and music appreciation. (can't remember the name, but it's referenced in their marketing material).

 

I was implanted at Stanford Medical Center on July 14th. The surgeon was very experienced with Med El implants. I received the longest electrode (Flex 28) fully inserted without issue. My surgeon described the surgery as a textbook success. Also, I still seem to have kept a good amount of residual hearing in the implanted ear, so hopefully it stays..

Following the surgery I have the standard ringing, dizziness and balance issues, but not too much pain. For comparison, this is much better feeling than a sinus infection or a hangover. I didn't get very nauseous from the anesthesia and was eating pizza a couple hours later without a problem.

For the processors I am getting both the Sonnet and Rondo. I always found behind the ear hearing aids very uncomfortable so I plan to use the Rondo more as well as the waterwear. But we'll see what works best. Does anyone here have both and prefer one or the other?

 

I am really looking forward to hearing my daughter better and communicating with her as well as with my wife and others, and meeting new people. Also hope to enjoy my favorite music again.

 

Cheers!

 

Tony

Welcome aboard Tony!

 

I just joined recently as well. I am new to the cochlear implant world, I just got activated a week ago! Regarding your question about the processors, I have both the Sonnet and the Rondo. The sonnet is actually not uncomfortable, at least for me, to wear. It's not heavy at all on your ear. I do occasionally knock it off of my ear when I go to tuck my long hair back or put my hair up sometimes. I myself actually prefer the Sonnet over the Rondo, at least for right now. I tried my Rondo on when I first got it and it kept falling off, even when I put it under my hair. I mainly use the sonnet and I got the Rondo since it has the waterproof cover. As a side note, if you work out, I'd recommend looking at the MED-EL sports headband that fits your Rondo. I like to still be able to hear things when I workout and the headband fits your rondo in it to protect it from too much sweat. 

 

Hope your activation goes well! 

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Thanks everyone!

 

Reading your experiences have all been helpful for me to approach it more calmly. Not knowing what can happen is probably the most scary part, but hearing your stories about how it happened for you, and how you all started at the very bottom and have climbed so high is very encouraging. I have climbed a lot of mountains in life (figuratively and literally!) and I'm up for the challenge! 

 

Thanks for the tips on everything. I'm definitely getting that sports band! 

 

My cold has gotten a little better, but lots of yellow yucky snot! Pretty standard for a cold for me, but I'll be ok, I think! I will definitely let you all know how it goes!

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Thanks everyone!

 

Reading your experiences have all been helpful for me to approach it more calmly. Not knowing what can happen is probably the most scary part, but hearing your stories about how it happened for you, and how you all started at the very bottom and have climbed so high is very encouraging. I have climbed a lot of mountains in life (figuratively and literally!) and I'm up for the challenge! 

 

Thanks for the tips on everything. I'm definitely getting that sports band!

 

I will definitely let you all know how it goes!

http://www.medel.com/us/sports-headband

 

There's a link top the sports headband tony.

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You can purchase eargear straight from their own website too.

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Hi Tony and welcome to Hearpeers. Thanks for sharing your experience to now. Good luck tomorrow. Let the journey begin.

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Ivana, I did not realize you did not have a CI. So you have a middle ear implant? Also, I think I saw that you are a doctor as well? And Croatia looks very beautiful in Rick Steves episodes, lucky you. All Mediterranean countries are beautiful to me.

 

I was wondering how other people's recoveries went and if they are having a similar issue that I am. My dizziness and balance issues are a lot better. Pain around the incision and under the skin around the implant is pretty much gone too but I still have a pretty deep pain in my middle ear along with feeling of being completely plugged up. If I don't take painkillers, the pain is very uncomfortable. I have a long history of sinus issues and my ears always get very plugged up with a cold and I have to take decongestants at the first sign or I get a sinus infection. So I'm a bit concerned here especially with antibiotics wearing off soon. I'm thinking it's time to take a proactive approach. I was not prescribed prednisone for after the surgery, but I have read that some people are prescribed that, maybe that would help. I has helped me in the past with inflammation. Does anyone have a similar experience?

 

 

Hi Tony,

 

I am little bit late - I was on vacation on that faboulous Adriatic coast ;):o   which close me to the point that I am a lot surprised that you know where is that because we˙re so tiny taking into the perspective of Canada, US or even Australia... :wacko:

But yes, lately Croatia became a top-destination  :P and Mary Beth even was here!  :wub:

 

So, you`re a new CI implant user - what I have learnt from my friends here it is an overwhelming but rewarding experience. They even directed me into research of what CI world is and interested me deeply for this topic. I have swallowed a giant cake of knowledge which smiles me each day. Recently I participated into starting up a new patient-group for CI support in my country - I will try to co-ordinate part with new technologies and communication with people. I have seen sooooo much possibility in this field that I fell in love with all obstacles but also in sweet rewards I got on my way lik in a computer game.  :wub:

You`re right - I am a doctor, an otorhinolaringologist/Ear, Nose, Throat specialist with special interest in otology and audiology which arouse from my ever-struggling with my hearing. Due to a certain congenital condition which does not deteriorate, I was born moderately hearing loos, but conductive type. This basically means that more than ever around I am daily in both worlds, silent one but also in the noise one. And also in that shaddowed 3rd world of "hearing shaddows" struggling to hear and to adapt myself into the hearing world. I have never had another life of normal hearing, but I do not regret at all - we play with given cards and I enjoy mine. Life experience is not what you got, than - what you do with it. I have build a wholw new world just looking 3 years back... And taking everything into perspective, I enjoy each one new task in my life.

 

You`re right - I am not a CI implantee than bone-conduction implantee. There is a hearing implant which is still not regulated in the US - the Bonebridge which altered my reality enormously.... Just when I think that I can not imagine how my life can have significant turmoil... I have stable relationship, pursuing my residency and than quite unexpected moment came: my best buddy and hearing companion died in my hand - I had it since I was 4 years old. It is, of course, a thing; but to me it was my whole world: without I hear almost really loud sound and nobody would like to pursue longer conversation in that intensity - with him I conquered all my obstacles. 

I got the replacement, but this was not that... A brand new hearing technology of digital world could not exchange my old analog, kind of tourist-mourn when they get back.... I had a lot of communication problems that I thought I will not be able to finish my residency. I felt discoureaged and lonely - people do not understand when they have to repeat themselves or turn themselves so I could understand them. I don˙t blame them, constantly thinking is tiresome.

So, back from black - I got the Bonebridge thankfully to Med-EL which generaously offered help when they heard my story. 

What I didn`t know how much I did omit without knowing and I thought that I hear almost normally. Then hearing adjusting - I have also had to go through the process of adjusting myself to all new events: hhearing of rain, hearing of all sounds which I have never known that although they are distant can be also loud - I didn`t have that sense of "hearing distance". My boyfriend called me and I asked him who is that so loud with him. He looked around and said - it`s people from the table next to his.  :o

Our favourite joke was when I returned from my tunning session: Why do you sound so quiet? You sound like a good old friend of the night...  :P

People who became me friends here, although implanted with CI`s give me a clues that that change is similar to their change of hearing pathways. Although not so dramatic, but I did not have anybody to ask and talk about it - I knew that I will have to adjust my intensity but I didn`t expect that there will be certain deteriorations and making decision in what direction start to walk... :blink:

 

Anyway, here we are...  :)

Regarding your sinus problem - you mentioned that yellow discharge which indicate sinonasal infection - definitely washing your nose and putting decongestant: OTC nose drops or even consider nasal corticosteroid spray which can help to relieve sinonasal mucosa and can cause that stuffy-feeling of nasal and middle ear congestion due to the connection over the Eustachian tubes.

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Hi Ivana, great reading your story! I hope you had a lot of fun on the beautiful Adriatic! I definitely plan on doing that with the family in the future.

 

Losing your ability to hear while in residency, I can only imagine was one of the most difficult challenges you have ever faced. It sounds like you pulled through and have smoother sailing now.

 

So you used an old analog device that worked very well for you? I always felt that after they stopped making analog hearing aids, the digital ones just didn't sound as good, and did not help me to hear much better. But perhaps I was also going through a time when my hearing was transitioning to the point that hearing aids no longer helped. I like how you describe different "worlds" Isn't that an interesting experience that many of us here have gone through? One that normal hearing people just do not encounter and experience. Things that are so normal for them such as hearing someone from across the room with their back turned, would be something that I can only dream of happening. It does always pain me to meet older people who have lost their hearing with age and do not know sign language, or have lipreading skills. They learn to cope with the loss and they feel cut off from their families and grandchildren. I wish more older people would get cochlear implants for this reason. I think more and more are learning about them, and just how well they are working for people now. I think that not only will they renew hearing, but they also renew life.

 

I was prescribed more antibiotics, and that kept things clear. The fullness is still there. At my activation, the surgeon said there was still some fluid behind the ear drum, but not much, and it was normal. He said I could resume normal activities, including swimming and running and such. I finally got in my first run in almost a month..... 6 tough miles! I felt that a corticosteroid or something similar would have been a good idea too. I use Astepro, which is anti-inflammation allergy spray, but not a steroid. but in the past, prednisone worked great, so I imagine other similar products would work well too. I have a friend who was just diagnosed with Meniere's disease and corticosteroid treatment did wonders for him. He has lost some hearing as well, and was told that he may eventually need a cochlear implant too. So if that happens, I hopefully can be a source of support for him

 

This board has been a big help for me too! I am really glad to be able to ask people for advice and to know that there is such a supportive community here. I'm looking forward to getting to know you all better!

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Sorry I've been holding out on an activation write up everyone! Life has been busy!

 

Activation and surgery followup went great. I have not had any pain for about almost 2 weeks now, and the doctor said I can resume normal activities and blow my nose and all that stuff. He said not to worry about any damage done from blowing my ears too soon after surgery, it wouldn't have affected it, so that is great. As other people have said, the only concern that he would have had is infection and I guess I healed up quite well.

 

My audiologist said the activation went very very well, so I am encouraged by that. I heard most of all the beeps as we increased the levels. Some I was feeling because they had to be increased too loud, and they just weren't coming through. I believe my audiologist turned off the ranges above 5000hz or so, and below 500hz as well I think. but I can't remember. I think I heard all except the very highest and the very lowest frequencies. Hopefully we can remap and get all the frequencies in.

 

After mapping, with an earplug in my non-implant ear, I was able to distinguish between 4 different words without reading lips. I was also able to distinguish between 4 different sounds: "ah" "ssss" "cheh" and "mmm".  "mmm" was hard as it's a low tone and I'm not sure if I was even hearing it through the implant. The audiologist says these frquencies are there, but my brain is not processing them because the high pitches are dominating and I have not heard them in so long, but I am not convinced, I think we need to adjust tomorrow.

 

High frequency tones are actually very clear for me. For some reason, when other peopel talk, everything sounds like a whisper without throat tones in them when they should be. but the high pitches do not sound robotic at all. I was actually conversing with just that and lipreading(which I am only moderately good at) from the start and was understanding speech. I do hear the lower tones in my own voice a bit more for some reason, and that does sound more robotic.

 

I was given 4 programs to step up. I basically stepped up 1 program each day and have been on the 4th one for the last 3 days. It has been slightly overwhelming at times, but mostly ok.

 

Music, depending on how loud it is, sounds better. I mostly am hearing the very high pitches though, such as cymbals crashing and flutes. It's not super clear sounding, but if I have the volume high enough, it does improve the overall sound. I notice that South African music (Paul Simon's Graceland is my favorite album ever) sound better than other types due to the complimenting rhythms in the bass and trebble. So that has been pretty cool. 

 

I am hearing so many sounds now and my wife and other people have said that I am definitely hearing them better and not asking for as many repeats. Te other day I was able to have converse with my wife from 50 feet away about what to cook for dinner and where to eat (on the patio, or inside, bbq, or stove). I needed a few repeats but normally I would not be able to hear anything from that far away and lipreading wouldn't have helped, that was pretty cool. I can hear water splashing, coins jingling,the cat meowing. I have heard a few distinct words of my daughter talking, and I already notice my daughter is happy and understand that "dada's magic ear" is helping him hear her better. She has been so great about it, it makes me really happy, but I know there's a ways to go before I will be able to converse with her.

 

Ok, that's all for now. It's late! Will try to update you all sooner next time!

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I think I can say in the name of other older members here - we´re glad if we helped and trying to move forward even if there will be more complex subjects. ;)

 

Tnx for reading my story although I didn`t plan to write it so loooong... :rolleyes:  But imagination just didn´t want to drop me off... :P

 

My professor once explained the difference between analog and digital hearing technology like difference between gramophone and CD/DVD player. I support it totally - with digital hearing aid I had something what I would describe as "hearing" nausea. After 8 hours of using it I just couldn´t stand having it more although I could use my analog model all night and day. I didn´t understand why, but then I have started to read about more about psychoacoustic effects. Long after I read in my otology book that the real reason lies in the fact that digital HA were programmed on the same matrix not taking care about the difference between hearing losses or the effect of the change of the technology. 

Also, recently, Mary Beth but also Kara have written how they experienced headache or even vertigo because of inadequate hearing map. Interesting food for our thoughts about world-wide-web of our brains...Or how much we don´t know about them.  :wacko:

Interestingly, I have never experienced that "hearing" nausea with my bone-conduction implant which actually uses - a digital technology.  :blink:

 

Little bit more about worlds... People tend to reject their thoughts about things they do not see or understand why it would be like that. After BB, I have found out how much I have missed - I was amazed by the fact that I can understand people in another room... whoooaooouu... it was a huge discovery for me... and all those other small episodes like having opportunity to chat with one person in a huge gathering, in the atmosphere of loud music or etc. One thing has left, I have to improve my listening skill in the old buildings which have a lot of echoes but for that I need my second ear. 

 

Astepro is, as I have read - an antihistamine drug which can not help during sinus infections which already happened. Nasal corticosteroid sprays are here but also for nasal allergies a lot better choice. Only if you have itchy running nose and you sneaze a lot - it helps with these symptoms. Nasal corticosteroid spray like Nasonex or similar group: https://www.drugs.com/nasonex.htmlcan actually help even when the pus infection started and you can avoid taking antibiotics systemicaly. It is worth of try - these are today´s guidelines for treating just-started sinonasal infection because great job is done when you allow your sinuses appropriate drainage. With these spray you lessen sinus ostias and allow that pus leave sinus cavities.

 

It´s a great to chat with you Tony - hope you will come to see Adriatic coast after all.  :P

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